Enclosure map project

Willersey Road, Badsey

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.
enclosure map

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photos: a7010 a7015 a7019 a7101

WILLERSEY ROAD

The present-day Willersey Road begins at the junction with School Lane and Chapel Street but, two hundred years ago, the road then known as Willersey Road began only at the road junction (known today as Three Ways) with Wickhamford and Bowers Hill. It is so-called because it is the road to Willersey just across the county border into Gloucestershire. The Badsey Enclosure Commissioners described it thus: "One other Public Carriage Road and Highway of the breadth of forty feet marked Number 4 on the said map commencing from the termination of the last described Road and leading in a Southward direction to Frances Grave from thence in an Eastwardly direction on the North side of Laid Hedge to Pear Tree Close belonging to Thomas Byrd and from thence in a Southwardly and Eastwardly direction until it enters the Parish of Willersey on the East side of Common called Dry Leys."

The Commissioners called the northern part the Wickhamford Road (as far as Three Ways) and described it thus: "One public Carriage Road and Highway of the breadth of thirty-five feet marked Number 3 on the said map leading in an Eastwardly direction out of the Village of Badsey aforesaid until it enters the Green, from thence in a Southwardly direction over the West side of the said Green until it enters Bully Brook Lane and from thence in or near its usual track before it communicates with the Willersey Road." From the description, it becomes apparent that the Wickhamford Road started in the present-day School Lane (shown on the map as Gibbs Lane), then turned south down the present-day Willersey Road. The Green referred to is Powells Green (where Belmont Terrace is located), which is marked on the map. Bully Brook Lane is also marked on the map and it appears that the Wickhamford Road passed through here. This northern part of the present-day Willersey Road was still known as Bully Brook Road or Lane at the beginning of the 20th century (named after the brook, a tributary of Badsey Brook, which runs under it by the village boundary); by 1924, it was definitely known as Willersey Road.

At the time of Enclosure, the majority of the land (certainly all the area from Sands Lane to Pear Tree Corner) was owned by the Reverend Thomas Williams. Reverend Williams died in 1829 and the land passed by inheritance to the Allies family, remaining in their ownership until 1864 when they sold it to Joseph Woodward, the agent of the estate. Woodward in turn sold the Badsey part of the estate (lot 1) in to John Pickup Lord in 1866, and it became part of what was later known as the Wickhamford estate (which included land in Badsey, Aldington and Bengeworth, as well as Wickhamford). Lord died in 1877, and his trustees administered the estate for many years, the final pieces of land not being sold until 1950. Some of the land was sold off in the years following his death, but much remained unsold over 50 years later and was put up for sale in 1930. A plan of 1934 reveals that still a lot remained unsold and it was not until 1950 that the remaining part of the Wickhamford estate (amounting to 561 acres in total) was sold to Christ Church, Oxford, by John Arthur Lord and Frederick Maurice Lord, the grandsons of John Pickup Lord.

Following the sale of land which had been in the Jones family for generations, development began on the east side north of Sands Lane in the 1880s with the building of Rose Villa, Auburn Villa and Bredon View; Homeleigh followed in the 1890s. South of Sands Lane, Belmont Terrace was built in 1900 following the sale of land by the Trustees of J P Lord. On the west side, Glebe Farm was situated, which existed until it was demolished in the 1960s to make way for new housing development. In 1900, Stanhope House was the first house to be built south of Glebe Farm, on the west side, followed by Cotswold View in 1906 as the Lord land began to be sold. During the 20th century, infill occurred on the eastern side, and then a number of new houses were built on the west side in the 1960s following the demolition of Glebe Farm. A small settlement of houses grew up at Three Ways in the 1950s and there is a scattering of houses in the southern part of the road.

East Side – 1, 1A, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 11A (Badsey Map W005 and G061)

The western part of these houses and gardens are on land which in 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, was allotted to John Jones as his first allotment: "Unto John Jones and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All those three several Allotments next herein after awarded, that is to say, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate on Powells Green containing two roods and thirty-four perches, bounded on the East by an Allotment herein awarded to Joseph Jones, on the South and remaining part of the East by old Inclosures belonging to the said John Jones, on the West and North by the Wickhamford Road and the private carriage Roads marked Numbers 8 and 10." The eastern part of these houses and back gardens are on land which John Jones already owned. It was called Sand Close and amounted to 4a 0r 18p in total. After John Jones’ death in 1850, the land remained in the Jones family but was mortgaged to Henry Burlingham for £2000. Joseph Jones (John’s nephew) defaulted on the mortgage and so the land was sold at auction on 7th July 1888. (See 1888 indenture map.) The land, known as Sands Garden, which had been used as garden ground, was divided into five lots of around an acre each. Within a decade, five detached houses (present-day numbers 1, 5, 7, 9 and 11) were built on the land. Infill occurred later in the 20th century.

East Side – Belmont Terrace, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35, 37, 39 (Badsey Map G119)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to the Reverend Thomas Williams. It was called Near New Close and amounted to 8a 1r 4p. After Reverend Williams’ death, it passed to the Allies family, then sold to Joseph Woodward, then sold to John Pickup Lord. The Trustees of J P Lord sold just over 4 acres to Joseph Owen Hall in 1897. He in turn sold a portion of the field in 1898 to Miss Martha Hooper and Belmont Terrace, a row of 12 houses, was built in 1900.

See also the article 1 to 12 Belmont Terrace Willersey Road; & 37 and 39 Willersey Rd & Bully Brook Willersey Road.

East Side – Bully Brook (Badsey Map W068)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this parcel of land was allotted to the Reverend Charles Phillott as his fifth allotment, but he then subsequently exchanged with the Reverend Thomas Williams: "Also all that Allotment situate in Bully Brook Field containing six acres and twenty-one perches, bounded on the East by old Inclosures belonging to the said Thomas Williams, on the South by an Allotment herein after awarded to the said Sarah Harrington and others, on the West by Bully Brook Lane, and on the North by Bully Brook, which said last mentioned Allotment is herein after given in Exchange to the said Thomas Williams." After Reverend Williams’ death, it passed to the Allies family, then sold to Joseph Woodward, then sold to John Pickup Lord. A house was built on the land in 1911. The house was sold to the tenants, the Sadler family in 1930.

East Side – Hornsfield (Badsey Map W069)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this parcel of land was allotted to Sarah, Mary and Elizabeth Harrington as their fourth allotment, but they then subsequently exchanged with the Reverend Thomas Williams: "Also all that other Allotment situate in Bully Brook Field containing seven acres and thirty-six perches, bounded on the East part by an Allotment herein awarded to the said William Wilson and afterwards Exchanged to the said Thomas Williams, on the South part by an Allotment herein awarded to Edward Savage, on the West part by the Wickhamford Road and on the North by the fifth Allotment herein awarded to the Reverend Charles Phillott and old Inclosures belonging to the Reverend Thomas Williams, which said Allotment is herein awarded in Exchanged to the said Thomas Williams." After Reverend Williams’ death, it passed to the Allies family, then sold to Joseph Woodward, then sold to John Pickup Lord. The Trustees of J P Lord sold the land in 1918 to George Crompton Lees-Milne of Wickhamford Manor; it was described as "a piece or parcel of land containing 6a 0r 28p being part of a piece of land called Bullybrook and Horn’s Close". There was a covenant that no sheds were to be built on the land. The 1944 Farming Survey map shows that Arthur Sears was the tenant during the war.

East Side – Sandfield, Briarcroft, The Sands, Montrose House, Three Ways, Wellwyn, Rosehaven, Ashgrove, Happylands (Badsey Map W071)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this parcel of land was allotted to Edward Savage as his only allotment, which he subsequently exchanged with the Reverend Thomas Williams: "Unto Edward Savage and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All that Allotment or piece of Land situate in Bully Brook Field containing seventeen acres two roods and thirty-seven perches, bounded on the East by the third Allotment herein awarded to the Reverend Thomas Williams, on the South by the third Allotment herein awarded to the said John Slatter, on the West by the Willersey and Wickhamford Roads, and on the North by Allotments awarded to Mary Harrington and others and William Wilson and herein awarded in Exchange to the said Thomas Williams and by the third Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Williams." The land passed by inheritance to his great-nephew, Edward Appelbee. In 1877, Thomas Appelbee, Edward Appelbee’s son, sold the land to Constance Lord, the widow of John Pickup Lord, who acquired much land in Badsey, Aldington, Wickhamford and Bengeworth in the preceding decade. In 1918, the Trustees of Captain Lord sold the north-western part of the land in four strips to John Hartwell (2a 3r 24p), Frank Herbert (1a 2r 30p), George Moisey (2a 0r 13p) and William Hartwell (3a 1r 23p). The same families still owned the land in the 1940s when the Farming Survey map was drawn up. Housing development began in the 1950s.

East Side – Goosecroft, Windynook (Badsey Map W065)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this parcel of land was allotted to the Reverend Thomas Williams as his third allotment: "Also all that other Allotment situate in Bully Brook Field containing forty-four acres three roods and two perches, bounded by the fifth Allotment herein awarded to the said John Slatter, Bully Brook Close, the first Allotment herein awarded to the said Edward Wilson, Vicars Ley Orchard, Abrahams Well Close late belonging to the said Thomas Burrowes and Susannah his wife, the second Allotment herein before awarded to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessees for Rectorial Tythes, the Allotment herein before awarded to the said Thomas Williams for Tythes, the Willersey Road, the third Allotment herein before awarded to the said John Slatter, the Allotment herein before awarded to the said Edward Savage, and an Allotment herein before awarded to the said William Wilson, an old Inclosure belonging to the said Thomas Williams." After Reverend Williams’ death, it passed to the Allies family, then sold to Joseph Woodward, then sold to John Pickup Lord. John Lord died in 1877, but over 50 years later, much of the land remained unsold. The estate was put up for sale at auction in 1930, with this land being sold as Lots 35 & 36 (Bush Ground), 39 (Moor Furlong), 40 (the two houses now known as Goosecroft and Windynook) and 41 (Hurst Way). However, a plan of 1934 reveals that this land was not sold and it was not until 1950 that the land was sold to Christ Church and the houses were sold to individual owners.

East Side – Pear Tree Cottages 1 & 2 (Badsey Map G121)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Jones. It was called Hancox Close and amounted to 5a 0r 27p. In 1815 it was exchanged with Christ Church: "And the said Commissioners hereby assign, allot and award in Exchange to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessees the said John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter, All that Close or Inclosed Ground called Hancox Close containing five acres and twenty-seven perches in lieu of and in Exchange for the said sixth Allotment herein awarded to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessees the said John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter." The land was still under the lesseeship of John Slatter in 1874. Pear Tree Cottages were built in the south-west corner about 1902.

East Side – Rowan House (Badsey Map G126)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to John Procter. It was called Peartree Close and amounted to 6a 0r 16p. In 1815 it was exchanged with the Reverend Charles Phillott: "And the said Commissioners hereby assign, allot and award in Exchange to the said Charles Phillott and his successors, All that piece or parcel of Inclosed Ground called Condercope Ground containing six acres and sixteen perches in lieu of and in Exchange for the said eighth Allotment herein awarded to the said Charles Phillott as such Curate as aforesaid."


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West Side – 2A (Badsey Map W003 and G057)

The house and front garden is situated on a plot of land which was allotted to James Harris as his first allotment in 1815: "Unto James Harris and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All those two several Allotments next herein after awarded, that is to say, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate in Powells Green containing thirty-seven perches and bounded on the East side by Wickhamford Road and on the South side by the second Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Williams, on the West side by old Inclosures belonging to the said James Harris and Thomas Williams and on the North by the first Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Williams." The back garden is on land which, in 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, was an old enclosure owned by the Reverend Thomas Williams. It was called Pig Close and amounted to 2a 1r 31p. Thomas Williams exchanged a small part of the land, close to the Vicarage, 26 perches, with the Reverend Charles Phillott, but this section remained in Williams’ hands. After Reverend Williams’ death, it passed to the Allies family, then sold to Joseph Woodward, then sold to John Pickup Lord. In 1894, it was sold in order to provide land for a schoolmaster’s house for the new school which was being built. In 1991, there was no longer a requirement for a house for the Head Teacher, so the house was sold and this southern-most part of the back garden was sold for building. A house called Avenell (number 2A) was built on the land.

West Side – 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, Glebe Farm demolished (Badsey Map W003 and G060)

The eastern section of the plot of land on which these houses are situated was allotted to James Harris as his first allotment by the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners in 1815: "Unto James Harris and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All those two several Allotments next herein after awarded, that is to say, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate in Powells Green containing thirty-seven perches and bounded on the East side by Wickhamford Road and on the South side by the second Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Williams, on the West side by old Inclosures belonging to the said James Harris and Thomas Williams and on the North by the first Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Williams." The western section of the plot of land was an old enclosure belonging to James Harris, being his house and homestead comprising 0a 1r 32p. In 1864, this plot of land, together with an area of farmland further south on the Willersey Road, and an orchard called The Pinnock, was sold by John Harris of Cropthorne, for a total of £1,200 to Christ Church (see valuation). It later became known as Glebe Farm; the farmhouse was situated approximately in the area of the back garden of the present-day number 4. Glebe Farm was demolished about 1960 and the land sold for housing.

West Side – 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48, 50, 52, 54, 56, 58, 60, 62 (Badsey Map G059)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to the Reverend Thomas Williams. It was called Great Stockey and amounted to 7a 1r 35p. Thomas Williams exchanged a small part of the field near the Vicarage with the Reverend Charles Phillott, leaving him with 6a 2r 22p. After Reverend Williams’ death, it passed to the Allies family, then sold to Joseph Woodward, then sold to John Pickup Lord. The land was divided into smaller plots and sold off, two plots abutting the road being sold for housing which was built in the first decade of the 20th century. Stanhope House (number 24) was built in 1900 and Cotswold View (numbers 34-60) were built in 1906. In 1919, Christ Church leased the land behind and to the north to Victor Charles Edward Cockerton; it was then sold to him in 1951. The land (3a 2r 34p) immediately behind these houses, accessed via a private road, is still owned by the Smith family to this day, but 1.87a of land to the north, which they also bought in 1951, was sold by Victor’s daughter, Winifred Joan Smith, to Worcestershire County Council for £950 to provide a school playing-field. A tiny part of the front gardens of numbers 18-22 are on a parcel of land which was allotted to the Reverend Thomas Williams as his second allotment in 1815 (W002): "Also all that other Allotment situate on Powells Green aforesaid containing eight perches, bounded by East by the Wickhamford Road, on the West by an old Inclosure belonging to Thomas Williams, and on the North by the first Allotment herein awarded to the said James Harris."

See articles The Stockey, Almanzora (22 Willersey Road) and 34 to 62 Willersey Road.


Knight family group at 11 Cotswold View

West Side – Marlborough House (Badsey Map W063)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this parcel of land was allotted to William Smith as his only allotment: "Unto William Smith and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All that Allotment or piece of Land situate in Meerden Field containing three acres two roods and three perches, bounded on the East by the second Allotment herein awarded to the said James Harris, on the South and West by the fourth Allotment herein awarded to the Curate of Badsey, and on the North by the Willersey Road."

West Side – No housing development (Badsey Map W062)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this parcel of land was allotted to James Harris as his second allotment: "Unto James Harris and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All those two several Allotments next herein after awarded, that is to say, … Also all that other Allotment situate in Meerden Field containing ten acres three roods and thirteen perches, bounded on the East by the fourth Allotment herein awarded to the Reverend Thomas Williams, on the South and part of the West by the fourth Allotment herein awarded to the Reverend Charles Phillott, on the remainder of the West by the Allotment herein awarded to William Smith and on the North by the Willersey Road." In 1864, this plot of land, together with the farm buildings in the centre of Badsey and an orchard called The Pinnock, was sold to Christ Church by John Harris of Cropthorne, for a total of £1,200 (see valuation). The land still belongs to Christ Church to this day.

West Side – Bohemia Gardens (destroyed by fire), The Paddocks (Badsey Map W061)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this parcel of land was allotted to the Reverend Thomas Williams as his fourth allotment: "Also all that Allotment situate in Meerden Field containing sixteen acres one rood and twenty-two perches, bounded on part of the East by the fifth Allotment herein awarded to the said William Wilson, on the remaining part of the East and South by the fourth Allotment herein awarded to the Curate of Badsey, on the West by the second Allotment herein awarded to the said James Harris, and on the North by the Willersey Road." After Reverend Williams’ death, it passed to the Allies family, then sold to Joseph Woodward, then sold to John Pickup Lord. A section of the land was sold in the early 20th century; a bungalow called Bohemia Gardens was built in 1912, but was destroyed by fire in 1934. The Paddocks was built in the 1960s.

West Side – No housing development (Badsey Map W057 and G128)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this land was acquired by Christ Church. One field (W057) was allotted to them by the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners: "Unto the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessee the most Honourable Mary Dowager Marchioness of Downshire and their successors according to their several estates rights and interests therein for and in lieu of the Tythe of Hay arising and renewing within the said Parish, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate in Meerden Field containing thirty-three acres one rood and twenty-six perches, bounded on the East by an Allotment herein after awarded to the Overseers of the Poor of Aldington and Badsey and an old Inclosure called Old Leys herein after given in Exchange to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessee the said Marchioness of Downshire, on the South by the said last mentioned old Inclosure and the Parish of Broadway, on the West by the Parish of Wickhamford and the fourth Allotment herein after awarded to the said Charles Phillott as Curate as aforesaid, and on the North by the said last mentioned Allotment and the Willersey Road." The neighbouring field (G128) was an old enclosure called Old Leys, amounting to 6a 3r 30p, which had been owned by Thomas Byrd. In 1815, Thomas Byrd exchanged it with Christ Church: "And the said Commissioners hereby assign, allot and award in Exchange unto the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessee the said Marchioness of Downshire, All that the said piece or parcel of Inclosed Land called Old Leys containing six acres three roods and thirty perches in lieu of and in Exchange for the said second Allotment of the said Dean and Chapter and their said Lessee." In 1836, the land was described as "poor". In 1861, the Marchioness of Downshire’s descendant, Lord Sandys, was the lessee and it was occupied by Frank Taylor. Francis Field valued it, saying: "Consists of three pieces of rough pasture, self laid down and in poor condition. It comprises 40 acres and is let at 10s per acre. It adjoins Hunt’s glebe on two sides, is a long way from the village and is approached by a bad road. Nothing can be made of the land without draining. This is expensive, but would repay well on the outlay. Land Tax 11s 4d. Estimate present value as £30 a year." In 1879, it was leased to Taylor. The Reverend Thomas Hunt wrote to the Reverend R G Faussett at Christ Church, asking for first refusal or gift of 40 acres as he had "three boys at school and Sandhurst and two girls to educate". This would appear to have happened, as in 1888, the Reverend Charles Gepp (Hunt’s successor) sent an application form for an improvement loan of £275 to drain 40 acres of glebe.

West Side – Aldington and Badsey Relief in Need Charity Land (Badsey Map W056 and W055)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, the Overseers of the Poor of Badsey and Aldington were made the following allotment: "Unto the Churchwardens and Overseers of the Poor of the Parish of Badsey and the Hamlet of Aldington and their successors in trust for the Poor of the said Parish and Hamlet in lieu of the Commonable part of their estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate in Meerden Field containing eight acres one rood and twenty-one perches, bounded on the East by the said last herein before awarded Allotment, by the old Inclosure herein awarded in Exchange to the Churchwardens of Badsey and on the remaining part of the East and South by the Parish of Broadway, on the West by an old Inclosure herein awarded in Exchange to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessee the said Marchioness of Downshire and the Allotment herein awarded to them for Tythes, and on the North by the Willersey Road. And the said Commissioners order and direct that the Mounds and Fences of the said Allotment next the Willersey Road and the Allotment herein awarded to the Churchwardens and Overseers of the Poor of Badsey shall be made and at all times for ever hereafter kept in repair by and at the expense of the said Churchwardens and Overseers of the said Parish and Hamlet for the time being." A further small wedge of land was allotted to the Overseers of the Poor of Badsey only: "And the said Commissioners hereby award and allot unto the Churchwardens and Overseers of the Poor of the Parish of Badsey and their successors in trust for the Poor of Badsey aforesaid in lieu of and for their right of cutting furze and bushes growing in and upon Dry Leys and Old Leys, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate in Meerden Field containing two roods and thirty-eight perches and bounded on the East by the Willersey Road and an old Inclosure herein awarded in Exchange to the Churchwardens of Badsey and the South and West sides by the Allotment next herein awarded. And the said Commissioners order and direct that the Mounds and Fences of the said Allotment lying next the Willersey Road shall be made and at all times for ever hereafter kept in repair by and at the expense of the said Churchwardens and Overseers of the Poor of Badsey aforesaid and their successors and the occupiers of the said Allotment for the time being." This land today belongs to the Aldington and Badsey Relief in Need Charity. The rent received from letting this "Poor’s Land" was at one time used to buy bread for poor people. Now that there is no longer a need for a distribution of free bread, the money is used to help residents who are "… in conditions of need, hardship or distress".

West Side – Badsey Parochial Church Council Land (Badsey Map G129)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Thomas Byrd. It was called Condercup Meadow and amounted to 1a 2r 9p. Thomas Byrd exchanged Condercup Meadow with land which had been allotted to the Churchwardens of Badsey.

 

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 22 November 2013. Email History@badsey.net.