Enclosure map project

Village Street, Aldington

Badsey website home page

Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.

enclosure map


Entering the village from the south


Sherwood Cottage


Sherwood Cottage and Stone Cottage


The Dove Cote


The Old House


Manor Cottage


Manor Cottage and Rose Cottage


Rose Cottage


Aldington Manor

Photos taken 2006/7. Aerial photos: a7152 a7158

VILLAGE STREET (Aldington Map Parcel No B)

The current-day Village Street runs from the centre of the village by the Manor House in a southwards direction to Badsey Road. In the 1808 Enclosure awards, the northern section of Village Street is not specifically mentioned in the schedule of roads, but is referred to as "an ancient lane". It extended as far as Sherwood Farm. After enclosure, a piece of Thomas Byrd’s Great Orchard on the east side was taken to widen the road; he was given an allotment of land as compensation. Until the late 19th century, the northern section of Village Street ran quite near to the front door of the Manor House and the kitchen window, but the road was then diverted. Donald Wasley, who grew up in Aldington between the wars, gives an entertaining account of the road diversion. He also records that as a child the first part of the road (from Badsey Road to Sherwood Farm and the Slaughter House) was known as "the end of the lane"; the section from Sherwood Farm to "The Corner and Nag Stable" was known as "The Village". See Letters from Don Wasley (1918 - 2000) and Roy Page about life in Badsey and Aldington.

The southern section was known in 1808 as Badsey Road and was described thus: "And one other Public Carriage Road and Highway of the like breadth of thirty feet branching out of an ancient Lane in the Village of Aldington aforesaid between the Homestead belonging to William Chambers, exchanged to the Curate of Aldington and an Orchard called the Great Orchard belonging to Thomas Byrd and passing thence in a Southward direction along its usual track to the Turnpike Road leading from Bengworth to Bretforton and thereinafter called the Badsey Road."

The Manor House, gardens and orchards occupied all the east side, so development did not begin on that side until the latter part of the 20th century when the estate was sold by the Ashwin family who had owned it since 1808. The Manor House, and all the land east of Village Street as far as Badsey Road, was bought by Mr Jerrim, a Birmingham businessman. He died intestate and the land was sold off to have a fair distribution in the family; it was then bought by B Brazier in the 1960s. Two detached houses were built and a cul-de-sac called Manor Gardens.

On the west side are seven old cottages, several hundred years old. Also on the west, there is a 20th century house called Sherwood Farm on the site of an older settlement, and two mobile homes, just north of the B4035 (shown on the Royal Mail database as Field Farm 1 and Field Farm 2).

East – Aldington Manor (Aldington Map Z010)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by George Day. It amounted to 1a 1r 2p and comprised part of the farmhouse and out-houses belonging to Aldington Farm. George Day had bought the Aldington Farm estate and Brooke’s Farm estate from Thomas Lord Foley in 1805 for £7,000. Aldington Farm had been in Lord Foley’s family for 140 years, an earlier Thomas Foley of Witley having bought "all that Manor of Aldington alias Aunton, and all that farm called Aunton Farm now in the tenure of William Jarrett, gentleman" in 1665. On 6th October 1808, just two days after the Enclosure Awards, George Day sold the farmhouse, together with all the estate bought from Lord Foley in 1805, to James Ashwin of Bretforton, for £12,000; the land remained in the Ashwin family until the middle of the 20th century. Soon after acquiring the property, James Ashwin extended the house considerably. The 19th century extension is today called The Manor House, with a postal address of Village Street (although the Electoral Roll has it listed as Main Street), whilst the original part, to the north, called Manor Court, is in Main Street. This auction shows the sale of goods after the death of Richard Ashwin in 1866, the last Ashwin to occupy the Manor. It was then let to tenants for the next nearly 90 years before being sold.


Manor House, Aldington

East – The Willows, Cherry Orchard northern part (Aldington Map Z014)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by Thomas Byrd. It amounted to 0a 2r 36p. The Byrd family had owned it since at least 1766 when this plot, and the land to the south, was described as "a messuage or tenement and two yard land and an half of arable land meadow and pasture ground with the appurtenances". In 1814, James Ashwin, who owned the neighbouring land to the north and east, contracted to buy this plot and the land to the south for £835 10s 0d; he now owned all the land on the east side of Village Street as far as Badsey Road and it remained in the Ashwin family until the middle of the 20th century. The buildings which were in existence on the Enclosure Map of 1807 had gone by the time of the Ordnance Survey map of 1883. In the early 20th century, the entrance of the present-day house called The Willows was the site of The Gardeners’ Arms, a modest drinking establishment for Market Gardeners (basically just a wooden lean-to shed with a tin roof, built against the brick wall which ran along the length of Village Street and marked the boundary of the Manor grounds). Behind it were the fruit trees belonging to the Manor (see Don Wasley letters). B Brazier, who bought the land in the 1960s, built Cherry Orchard. The Willows was built at a later date after a further portion of the land was sold.

East – Cherry Orchard southern part (Aldington Map Z015)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by Thomas Byrd. It amounted to 3a 1r 28p and was called Great Orchard. A small piece of the orchard was ordered to be taken in 1808 for the purpose of widening the road, for which Thomas Byrd received compensation in some waste land further south: "… for that part of the Great Orchard belonging to the said Thomas Bird taken therefrom for the purpose of widening the Lane in the Village of Aldington aforesaid and for making the new Fence against the said Road and which is so taken by and with the consent and approbation of the said Thomas Bird by his signing and sealing these presents. In 1814, James Ashwin, who owned the neighbouring land, contracted to buy for £835 10s 0d the orchard and adjoining plot of land to the north. It remained in the Ashwin family until the middle of the 20th century. B Brazier, who bought the land in the 1960s, built Cherry Orchard.

East – Waste Land on Bend (Aldington Map A023)

Until the early 19th century, this land was part of the common fields of Aldington. In 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this plot of land was allotted to Thomas Byrd as his third allotment as compensation for loss of a small part of his orchard to the north: "And also all that other piece or parcel of Land situate upon the Waste Land opposite the Halfpenny Piece containing nineteen perches, bounded on the North by the Great Orchard belonging to the said Thomas Bird, on the East by the Brook, and on the South-West by the Badsey Road aforesaid. The Fences for inclosing the said Allotment are those against the said Road, which said three Allotments lastly hereinbefore Awarded to the said Thomas Bird the said Commissioners do hereby declare adjudge and determine to be a fair, just and reasonable compensation and satisfaction to the said Thomas Bird for the Estate and right of Common thereto in, over and upon the Lands by the said Act directed to be divided and Inclosed and also a fair just and reasonable compensation and satisfaction for that part of the Great Orchard belonging to the said Thomas Bird taken therefrom for the purpose of widening the Lane in the Village of Aldington aforesaid and for making the new Fence against the said Road and which is so taken by and with the consent and approbation of the said Thomas Bird by his signing and sealing these presents." This land was acquired by James Ashwin in 1814, along with the land to the north; it remained in the Ashwin family until the middle of the 20th century.

East – Osier Bed (Aldington Map Z030)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this triangular plot of land between Village Street, Badsey Brook and Badsey Road, was an old enclosure owned by George Day. It amounted to 0a 1r 25p and was an osier bed. It comprised part of the estate bought from Thomas Lord Foley in 1805 and was later sold to James Ashwin in 1808. It remained in the Ashwin family until the middle of the 20th century.

 


View Larger Map

West – Field Farm 1 & 2 (Aldington Map A002)

Until the early 19th century, this land was part of the common fields of Aldington. In 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this plot of land was allotted to the Curate of Badsey as his first allotment: "To and for the said Curate of the Perpetual Curacy of Badsey aforesaid and his Successors Curates as aforesaid, All those several pieces or parcels of Land, Messuages, Barn, Stables and Buildings next hereinafter mentioned and described (that is to say), All that piece or parcel of Land situate in the Halfpenny Piece, Newland Furlong, the furlong shooting against the Turnpike Road leading from Bengworth to Bretforton and places adjacent, containing thirteen acres and twenty perches, bounded on the North by the first Allotment herein Awarded to Edward Laugher, on the East by Badsey Road, on the South by the Bretforton Turnpike Road and on the West by the Allotment herein Awarded to the Marchioness of Downshire and Sir John Dashwood King as Lessees as aforesaid. The Fences for inclosing the said Allotment are those on the North, the East and South sides thereof." Seven years later, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, the Reverend Charles Phillott exchanged this land with John Procter: "And the said Commissioners assign, allot and award in Exchange to the said John Procter and his Heirs, All that messuage or Tenement and the outbuildings and appurtenances belonging containing one rood and twenty-five perches and also all those two closes or Inclosed Grounds containing thirteen acres and twenty perches called Halfpenny Close and Newland situate in the Hamlet of Aldington in the said Parish of Badsey in lieu of and in Exchange for the said sixth Allotment of the said John Procter." It passed by inheritance to the Reverend Thomas Clark who then sold the land to Thomas Byrd (1836-1919). In 1898 and 1899, Thomas Byrd sold small parts of the western portion of the land and a house was built (Briarlea on Badsey Road). A map of 1905 reveals that the rest of the field had been divided into seven sections with the following people as tenants: E Butler, J Byrd, C Heath, J Byrd (two plots), A Dore, J Barnard. The same layout more or less pertained when the farming survey map of 1944 was produced (there were now six sections rather than seven, the two most northerly strips being combined), the tenants being: H Byrd, V Wasley, Hawker, Mrs A Barnard.

West – Sherwood Farm (Aldington Map A004)

Until the early 19th century, this land was part of the common fields of Aldington. In 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this plot of land had previously belonged to William Chambers but was then allotted to the Curate of Badsey as his third allotment: "And also all that Messuage (now divided into Two Dwelling Houses), Barns, Stables and other Buildings, together with the site thereof situate in the Village of Aldington aforesaid with the Garden, Foldyard and Rickyard thereto adjoining and belonging now or late in the occupation of the said William Chambers or his tenants, containing together one rood and twenty-five perches, bounded on the North by a Garden and Buildings belonging to the said Edward Laugher, on the East, the South-East and South by a Lane leading into the Village of Aldington aforesaid and on the West by the first Allotment herein Awarded to the said Edward Laugher, which said Messuage, Barn, Stables and other Buildings, together with the site thereof, Garden, Foldyard and Rickyard aforesaid are so set out and allotted and Awarded by and with the consent and approbation of the said William Chambers and the said Curate as aforesaid, the said Dean and Chapter as patron of the said Perpetual Curacy of the Parish Church of Badsey and the Right Reverend the Lord Bishop of the said Diocese, testified by their severally signing and affixing their respective seals to these presents." Seven years later, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, the Reverend Charles Phillott exchanged this land with John Procter: "And the said Commissioners assign, allot and award in Exchange to the said John Procter and his Heirs, All that messuage or Tenement and the outbuildings and appurtenances belonging containing one rood and twenty-five perches and also all those two closes or Inclosed Grounds containing thirteen acres and twenty perches called Halfpenny Close and Newland situate in the Hamlet of Aldington in the said Parish of Badsey in lieu of and in Exchange for the said sixth Allotment of the said John Procter." It is not known whether the house was ever occupied during the latter part of the 19th century, as it is believed that the Sherwoods, who farmed there for several decades, lived at the cottage abutting the street, also owned by John Procter. The farm passed to John Procter’s descendants. His great-nephew, the Reverend Thomas Humphris Clark, sold the farm in 1885 to Thomas Byrd (1836-1919). Thomas Byrd Junior (1879-1934) leased the land to John Byrd and Harry Byrd (no relations). The property was described as "a barn and outbuildings including a cow shed and slaughter house (formerly two stables)". In the mid 20th century, the barn was still in existence. It was a very old, thatched building, with lots of holes in the roof, situated close to the road; behind was a yard for lorries to bring the animals, a small pond, and other outbuildings linking up to the slaughter-house. The slaughter-house was still in use in the 1970s. It is still standing in 2006, but has been re-roofed.

West – Sherwood Cottage, Stone Cottage, The Dove Cote (Aldington Map Z025)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by Edward Laugher. It amounted to 0a 1r 0p. Deeds relating to the property show that it had previously been owned by Thomas Blayney. In 1813, John Procter exchanged land in Badsey with all of the land that Edward Laugher owned in Aldington and became the owner of the properties, described as "two cottages". The cottages (by the mid 19th century and through to the present-day, the cottages were three in number) passed to John Procter’s descendants. His great-nephew, the Reverend Thomas Humphris Clark, sold the cottages in 1885 to Thomas Byrd. Thomas Byrd died in 1919; the farm then remained in a Byrd family trust until about the 1970s when the individual cottages were sold.

West – The Old House (Aldington Map Z024)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by William Savage. It amounted to 0a 0r 36p. The first known owner of the house was Henry Knight (1699-1769). His son, Malachi, sold the house in 1785 to Thomas Grove; the house was then sold to Edward Savage in 1799. It remained in the Savage family until 1877 when it was sold to Thomas Byrd. Thomas Byrd died in 1919; the house then remained in a Byrd family trust until about the 1970s when it was sold. Betty Styles, the daughter of Victor and Illot Wasley who lived at the house from 1915 to 1977, bought the house at auction; she sold it after her parents’ deaths.


Old House

West – Thatch Cottage, Manor Cottage, Rose Cottage (Aldington Map Z011)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by George Day. It comprised cottages and gardens and amounted to 0a 0r 32p, and was part of the Aldington Farm estate. George Day had bought the Aldington Farm estate and Brooke’s Farm estate from Thomas Lord Foley in 1805 for £7,000. Aldington Farm had been in Lord Foley’s family for 140 years, an earlier Thomas Foley of Witley having bought "all that Manor of Aldington alias Aunton, and all that farm called Aunton Farm now in the tenure of William Jarrett, gentleman" in 1665. On 6th October 1808, just two days after the Enclosure Awards, George Day sold the cottages, together with all the estate bought from Lord Foley in 1805, to James Ashwin of Bretforton, for £12,000; the land remained in the Ashwin family until the middle of the 20th century. The cottages, in great need of modernisation, were sold to individual owners in the 1950s and 1960s.

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net..


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 7 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.