Enclosure map project

Seward Road, Badsey

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.
enclosure map

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photos: a6980 a7035 a7037 a7225

SEWARD ROAD

Seward Road comprises a development of houses built between the 1960s and 1980s, plus a barn conversion. Until the first half of the 20th century, the large houses on the west side of the High Street had long stretches of land extending to Badsey Brook. At the time of the Badsey Enclosure, all the land was in private ownership, and continued to be owned by just a few families until the 20th century. By the latter half of the 20th century, these large plots of land were no longer viable and gradually the land at the rear of the houses was sold off for development. The rather piecemeal development of the road is because of the differing times when land became available. Here are details about the planning applications for Seward Road (link to be added).

The first houses to be built were in 1965 once the access road called The Poplars had been built. Three detached houses and two pairs of semi-detached houses (present-day numbers 26-38) were built on the land which had once belonged to the house known as The Poplars on the High Street and which was demolished in the 1960s.

The road is named after the Seward family who gave the name to the house, Seward House, on the High Street. Seward Road now extends much further than the land held by the Sewards, but at the time that the first houses went up, the Seward House land was some of the first to be developed.

East Side – 1, 3, 5; West Side – 2, 4, 6 (Badsey Map G027)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Sarah Harrington. It was part of the garden of a house (present-day number 8 High Street) and homestead and amounted to 1a 1r 21p. Edward Appelbee acquired the house in the 1820s. Harrington House was sold by the trustees of the will of Thomas Appelbee and his sister, Mrs William Gibbs (Edward Appelbee’s children), at a sale at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham, on 6th July 1891. It was bought by Arthur Jones, who then sold it to Edward Johns in 1921 (the Johns family had been tenants since 1887). It remained in the Johns family until 1965 when it was sold to Ernest Mustoe, Henry King and Harry Robinson, who intended to develop the site. The western part of the land was sold in 1968 to Branden Housing Industries Ltd which led to the building of these houses.

East Side – 7, 9, 11, 13, 15; West Side – 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 (Badsey Map G026)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to William Wilson. It was part of the garden of a house (present-day number 10 High Street) and homestead and amounted to 1a 2r 37p. William Wilson died in 1818 and it passed by inheritance to his son, William George Wilson. In 1842, William Junior sold this and all his other land (76 acres in total) to James Ashwin of Bretforton for £3290 10s 0d. Shortly after this, Edward Appelbee, who lived at neighbouring Harrington House, bought the house and adjacent blacksmiths. Hollywood Villa, as it was later known, was sold as part of the Harrington House estate by the trustees of the will of Thomas Appelbee and his sister, Mrs William Gibbs (Edward Appelbee’s children), at a sale at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham, on 6th July 1891. It was bought by Arthur Jones, who then sold it to Edward Johns in 1921 (the Johns family had been tenants since 1887). In 1965, the Johns family sold the bulk of the land to Ernest Mustoe, Henry King and Harry Robinson, but retained Hollywood Villa and the building which had formerly housed the blacksmith. The most westerly part of the land was sold in 1968 to Branden Housing Industries Ltd and this led to the building of these houses.

East Side – Back garden of 15, 17, 19, 21; West Side – 18, 20, 22, 24 (Badsey Map G025)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Simpson. It was a house and homestead (present-day number 18 High Street) and amounted to 1a 1r 13p. In the 1840s, siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd, who owned the land to the south, bought "the messuage or tenement, buildings, garden, orchard and premises." Most of the land was sold to John Cull who moved to Badsey in about 1883 to set up a baker’s business (known throughout most of the 20th century as The Sumachs Bakery). The house on High Street is still owned by a descendant of the Cull family to this day but the western part of the land was sold off in the 1960s for housing development. The area of land to the south of number 21 shows the turning-point for the original road when there were just a few houses.

West Side – 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38 (Badsey Map G023)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Thomas Byrd. It was part of the garden of a house and homestead (The Poplars, demolished in 1966) and amounted to 1a 3r 12p. It was bought by Horace Wheatley in the early 20th century and remained in the Wheatley family until the 1960s when the land was sold for development. The houses on this plot of land were the first to be built on Seward Road, as they were at the western end of the access road called The Poplars which had been built.

East Side – The Barn; West Side – 40, 42, 44, 46 northern part (Badsey Map G020)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Jones. It was part of the garden of Burrows’ house and homestead and amounted to 1a 2r 18p. It was known as Burrows’ House because, until about 1800, it had been owned by Thomas and Susannah Burrows (née Seward), Susannah’s family having owned the house for a hundred years previously; but throughout most of the 19th century and through to the present day, the house has been known as Seward House. Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, Mary and William Byrd who lived at the neighbouring house, The Poplars. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). William Byrd got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; an Abstract of Title dated 1890 shows that William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings, and began to sell off the land. The foldyards and buildings (which included the barn) amounted to 0a 2r 12p. Seward House was bought in 1890 by William Baldwyn of Ashton under Hill. After his death in 1898, it passed by inheritance to his co-heiresses, Frances Baldwyn Smith and Ann Heavens Bamber, who then sold it to Julius Sladden (who had been tenant since 1879) for £1,430. The Ordnance Survey map of 1883 shows that the land nearest the brook, known as Lower Orchard, was no longer part of this property, but had combined with the neighbouring properties to the north to provide pasture of 3a 2r 11p and was sold separately.In 1907, the house passed out of Byrd ownership, being bought by the tenant, Julius Sladden. The Sladdens owned the house until 1985 but the barn was retained by the Sladden family. The southern end of the barn was converted to residential use in the 1970s.

 


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East Side – 23; West Side – 46 southern part, 48, 50 (Badsey Map G019)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to John Jones. It was part of the garden of a house and homestead (The Laurels, High Street) and amounted to 1a 0r 6p. The land ran down to Badsey Brook; just across the brook, in the parish of Aldington, John, and his brother Joseph, had bought land in 1803. Joseph’s land was immediately opposite, whilst John’s land was further to the north. The brothers came to an agreement to allow John access to his ground via Joseph’s: "it should and might be lawful to offer the said John Jones his heirs and assigns at all times for ever thereafter to have and enjoy a road for wagons carts and carriages and his and their agents servants and workmen over the ground called Under Badsey Ground from his orchard over the brook at the bottom thereof without the lawful let suit trouble hindrance interruption molestation or denial of him the said Joseph Jones his heirs or assigns or any person or persons whomsoever and it was thereby further declared and agreed between the said John Jones and Joseph Jones testified as aforesaid that a bridge over the said brook should be built and repaired for ever thereafter at the joint expense of the said John Jones and Joseph Jones their heirs and assigns in equal portions share and share alike." This right of access appears to have lapsed some time during the 19th century. After John Jones’ death, the house was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. The house and land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). William Byrd got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; an Abstract of Title dated 1890 shows that William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings, and began to sell off the land and property.

West Side – 52, 54, 56, 58 northern part (Badsey Map G018)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Jones. It was part of the garden of a house and homestead (demolished in 1869) and amounted to 1a 0r 20p. Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. By the latter part of the 19th century, several families seemed to live in the building, and a part of it was used for a Wesleyan chapel. According to documents at Christ Church, it was empty for some years and was bought in 1869 and knocked down. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). William Byrd got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; an Abstract of Title dated 1890 shows that William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings, and began to sell off the land.

East Side – 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 39 back garden, 41 back garden, 43 northern part; West Side – 58 southern part, 60, 62, 64 (Badsey Map G015)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Jones. It formed part of the grounds of a house and homestead (Malvern House, High Street) which amounted to 1a 3r 27p. Joseph Jones sold most of his land and houses in Badsey in 1831, but retained this property. The Jones family had financial difficulties and, in 1868, Joseph’s widow and children were forced to sell the house because of defaulting on the mortgage. It was bought by William Byrd, whose family owned some of the large houses along the High Street. William Byrd himself got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; an Abstract of Title dated 1890 shows that William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings, and began to sell off the land. The house (by then known as Malvern House) was put up for sale at public auction on 30th June 1890 and was bought by William Baldwyn of Ashton-under-Hill, who also purchased Seward House. After his death in 1898, it passed by inheritance to his co-heiresses, Frances Baldwyn Smith and Ann Heavens Bamber, who then sold the house to Arthur Edward Jones in 1901 for £656. Arthur was the grandson of Joseph Jones who had owned the house at the time of Enclosure and so the family home was recovered. The house remained in the Jones family until 1996 when Arthur’s daughter-in-law, Bertha died, although 1.26 acres of land at the back was sold in 1977 to SquareDeal Homes Ltd, which paved the way for the building of these houses.

East Side – 35, 37, 39, 41, 43 southern part, 45, 47, 49 northern part; West Side – 66, 68, 70 northern part (Badsey Map G014)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to John Procter. It was called Nap Orchard and amounted to 1a 2r 14p. John Procter then exchanged the land with the Reverend Thomas Williams. "And the said Commissioners assign, allot and award in Exchange to the said Thomas Williams and his Heirs, All those three Cottages and Gardens called Nap Close and Nap Orchard containing three acres two roods and eleven perches in lieu of and in Exchange for the said sixth Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Williams and his Heirs" (Nap Close was the neighbouring plot to the south and the cottages, since demolished, were on the High Street). Thomas Williams died in 1829 and the land passed by inheritance to the Allies family, remaining in their ownership until 1864 when they sold it to Joseph Woodward, the agent of the estate. Woodward in turn sold the Badsey part of the estate (lot 1) in 1866 to John Pickup Lord; he died in 1877, but his executors administered the estate for some time. Arthur Jones bought the land in 1911. It remained in the Jones family until 1977 when it was sold by his daughter-in-law, Bertha Jones, to SquareDeal Homes Ltd, which paved the way for the building of these houses.

East Side – 49 southern part, 51, 53, 55, 57, 59, 61; West Side – 70 southern part, 72 (Badsey Map G011)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to John Procter. It was called Nap Close and amounted to 1a 2r 38p. John Procter then exchanged the land with the Reverend Thomas Williams: "And the said Commissioners assign, allot and award in Exchange to the said Thomas Williams and his Heirs, All those three Cottages and Gardens called Nap Close and Nap Orchard containing three acres two roods and eleven perches in lieu of and in Exchange for the said sixth Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Williams and his Heirs." (Nap Orchard was the neighbouring plot to the north and the cottages, since demolished, were on the High Street.) Thomas Williams died in 1829 and the land passed by inheritance to the Allies family, remaining in their ownership until 1864 when they sold it to Joseph Woodward, the agent of the estate. Woodward in turn sold the Badsey part of the estate (lot 1) in 1866 to John Pickup Lord; he died in 1877, but his executors administered the estate for some time. Arthur Jones bought the land in 1911. It remained in the Jones family until 1977 when it was sold by his daughter-in-law, Bertha Jones, to SquareDeal Homes Ltd, which paved the way for the building of these houses.


Seward Road, November 1973

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 5 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.