Enclosure map project

Sands Lane, Badsey

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.
enclosure map


Looking up Sands Lane from Willersey Road


Nos 1 & 3


Cotswold View 13-19


Market gardener's hovel


Grosvenor House 12


Scout hut on Recreation Ground


Recreation Ground


Across field towards 22 Sands Lane


Across pumpkin field towards Cotswold Garden Flowers

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photos: a7019 a7069 a7112

SANDS LANE

In 1815, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure, this road was described as "One other private Carriage Road and Drift Way of the breadth of twenty-five feet marked 11 on the said plan, branching out of the said Wickhamford Road in a South-East direction until it enters the third Allotment to John Jones." It is likely that it has been known as Sand Lane since early times, as it was the road leading to Sand Field, but it is first referred to as such in the 1891 census. Later in the 20th century, the name changed to Sands Lane.

The first house to be built was in the 1860s, on the south side, after the sale of Edward Wilsonís land. On the north side, a terrace of four houses was built in 1889 and a further terrace of four in 1893, followed by two semi-detached houses a few years later, following the sale of John Jonesí land. In the early years of the 20th century, some more detached houses were built on the south side, but then further development did not take place until the latter part of the 20th century. A Recreation Ground was created on the north side in 1920.

The road was given house numbers in the 1960s. The numbering appears a bit haphazard, as numbers were presumably left for anticipated development. The numbers range from 1-24, but there are no numbers 2, 4, 6, 8, 14, 16, 20 (the first four houses on the south side, which could have been numbered 2-8, have house names instead).

North Side - 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, Silver Dawn (Badsey Map G061)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to John Jones. It was called Sand Close and amounted to 4a 0r 18p. After John Jonesí death in 1850, the land remained in the Jones family but was mortgaged to Henry Burlingham for £2000. Joseph Jones (Johnís nephew) defaulted on the mortgage and so the land was sold at auction on 7th July 1888. (See 1888 indenture map.) The land, known as Sands Garden, which had been used as garden ground, was divided into five lots of around an acre each. Within a decade, houses were being built on the land, firstly a terrace of four houses called Cotswold View (numbers 13-19) in 1889, then another terrace of four houses called Cotswold Terrace (numbers 5-11) in 1893 and finally a pair of semi-detached houses (numbers 1 and 3). Silver Dawn was built in the 1960s.


Knight family group at 11 Cotswold View

North Side - 21, 23 (Badsey Map G062)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Jones. It was called Sand Close and amounted to 3a 3r 22p. Joseph Jones sold this at some stage during the 19th century to siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). William Byrd got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtorsí court in 1880; an Abstract of Title dated 1890 shows that William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrdís land-holdings, and began to sell off the land. This field, together with land to the east, now comprised a field of 16a 1r 20p called Sands and Harperís Close, and was divided into smaller lots for sale. It remained as market garden land until these bungalows were built in the 1960s at the same time as the adjacent Binyon Close.

North Side Ė Recreation Ground and Scout Hut (Badsey Map G063 and W041)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, the western portion of the plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Jones. It was called Stone Pippin Orchard and amounted to 2a 0r 16p. In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this piece of land was allotted to Joseph Jones was allotted the adjacent land to the east as his third allotment: "Also all that other Allotment situate in Hadshill Field and Foxhill Field containing thirty-seven acres two roods and thirty-two perches including the private Road passing over the same, bounded on the East side by an Allotment herein awarded to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessees the said John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter and herein after Exchanged with the said Joseph Jones, on the South side by Allotments herein awarded to the said Thomas Byrd and the Churchwardens of Badsey and the Marchioness of Downshire, and an old Inclosure belonging to the said Thomas Byrd on further part of the East side by the said last mentioned old Inclosure and Pitchness Closes, on further part of the South by old Inclosures belonging to Edward Wilson and an Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Byrd, on the remainder of the East by the said last mentioned Allotment, an old Inclosure belonging to the said Joseph Harper and herein after awarded in Exchange to the said Joseph Jones and the second Allotment herein awarded to the said John Jones, on further part of the South by the said private carriage Road marked Number 11, on part of the West and remainder of the South by old Inclosures belonging to the said Joseph Jones, on further part of the West by the first Allotment herein awarded to the said John Jones, on part of the North and remainder of the West by old Inclosures belonging to the said Joseph Jones and on the remainder of the North by Allotments herein awarded to the Reverend Thomas Williams, John Slatter and Edward Wilson respectively." Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). William Byrd got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtorsí court in 1880; an Abstract of Title dated 1890 shows that William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrdís land-holdings, and began to sell off the land. This field, together with land to the west and to the east, now comprised a field of 16a 1r 20p called Sands and Harperís Close, and was divided into smaller lots for sale. In 1912, this land was bought to create a Recreation Ground, but the ground was not formally opened until 1920. In the 1950s, a Scout Hut was built at the southern end.

North Side Ė Land to East of Recreation Ground (Badsey Map W037)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this piece of land was allotted to John Jones as his second allotment: "Also all that other Allotment or parcel of Land situate in Sand Field containing five acres two roods and thirty-eight perches, bounded on part of the East by an old Inclosure belonging to Edward Wilson, on the remaining part of the East and South by an Allotment herein awarded to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessees the said John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter and the private carriage Road Number 11, on the West by the third Allotment herein awarded to the said Joseph Jones, and on the North side by an old Inclosure belonging to Joseph Harper and herein after awarded in Exchange to the said Joseph Jones." After John Jonesí death in 1850, the land remained in the Jones family but was mortgaged to Henry Burlingham for £2000. Joseph Jones (Johnís nephew) defaulted on the mortgage and so the land was sold at auction on 7th July 1888 as Lots 6 (1a 2r 29p), 7 (2a 0r 0p) and 8 (1a 3r 30p), known as The Second Sands. (See 1888 indenture map.)


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South Side - Hitower, Fieldview, Bramble, Pendoc, Seymour, 10, 12 (Badsey Map G119)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to the Reverend Thomas Williams. It was called Near New Close and amounted to 8a 1r 4p. Thomas Williams died in 1829 and the land passed by inheritance to the Allies family, remaining in their ownership until 1864 when they sold it to Joseph Woodward, the agent of the estate. Woodward in turn sold the Badsey part of the estate (lot 1) in 1866 to John Pickup Lord and it became part of what was known as the Wickhamford estate, although it covered land in Badsey, Aldington and Bengeworth, as well as Wickhamford. Lord died in 1877, but his executors administered the estate for some time. A small portion of the land was sold in the first decade of the 20th century for the building of number 12 (Grosvenor House) in 1910. The land immediately to the east and west was put up for sale at auction in 1930 as Lots 32 and 33. However, a plan of 1934 reveals that this land was not sold and it was not until 1950 that this, known as Yew Close, and the remainder of the Wickhamford estate (amounting to 561 acres in total) was sold to Christ Church, Oxford, by John Arthur Lord and Frederick Maurice Lord, the grandsons of John Pickup Lord.

See also - market gardener's hovel on Sands Lane.

South Side - 18 and eastern half of garden of Number 12 (Badsey Map G118)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to the Reverend Thomas Williams. It was called Far New Close and amounted to 5a 3r 33p. Thomas Williams died in 1829 and the land passed by inheritance to the Allies family, remaining in their ownership until 1864 when they sold it to Joseph Woodward, the agent of the estate. Woodward in turn sold the Badsey part of the estate (lot 1) in 1866 to John Pickup Lord, who died in 1877, but whose executors administered the estate for some time.

South Side - 22, 24 (Badsey Map G117)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Edward Wilson. It was called Bully Brook Close and amounted to 4a 2r 30p. On 23rd July 1866, Edward Wilson sold thise land at an auction at The Northwick Arms Hotel, Evesham, in Lot 5. According to the conditions of sale, in 1851 Bully Brook was straightened and small portions of the lands lying on each side of the old watercourse were mutually conveyed by and to Edward Wilson and his Mortgagee on the one hand, and Robert Allies, the adjoining proprietor, on the other (this appears to be part of W065 which had been allotted to the Reverend Thomas Williams in 1815, and had passed by inheritance to Robert Allies). Shortly after the sale, a house (number 22) was built on the land.

South Side - Cotswold Garden Flowers (Badsey Map W048)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their award, this piece of land was allotted to Mary, Sarah and Elizabeth Harrington as their third allotment: "Also all that other Allotment situate in the Sand Field containing five acres and seventeen perches, bounded on the East by the third Allotment herein awarded to the said John Jones and on all other sides by sundry old Inclosures and the said Road marked Number 11, which said Allotment is herein awarded in Exchange to the said John Jones." They then exchanged the land with John Jones. "And the said Commissioners hereby assign, allot and award in Exchange with John Jones and his Heirs, All that the aforesaid Allotment or parcel of Land containing five acres and seventeen perches being the third Allotment herein awarded to the said Mary Harrington and others and bounded as herein before described in lieu of and in Exchange for All those two pieces or parcels of Inclosed Land herein after described, that is to say, Unto and for the said Mary Harrington, Elizabeth Harrington and Sarah Harrington and their Heirs, All those two pieces of Land of him the said John Jones called Claybrook Orchard and Claybrook Close containing three acres three roods and thirteen perches in lieu of and in Exchange for the said third Allotment herein before awarded in Exchange to the said Mary Harrington, Elizabeth Harrington and Sarah Harrington." After John Jonesí death in 1850, the land remained in the Jones family but was mortgaged to Henry Burlingham for £2000. Joseph Jones (Johnís nephew) defaulted on the mortgage and so the land, which by then was used as garden ground, was sold at auction on 7th July 1888 as Lots 9 (0a 2r 30p), 10 (2a 0r 16p) and 11 (2a 3r 23p), known as Briar Croft. In the 20th century (and possibly from 1888), the land was owned by the Sladden family. The land was left to Badsey and Aldington Parish Council for use as a burial ground, but the Council felt it was too remote a location and so sold it in 1989 to Bob Brown who started a nursery called Cotswold Garden Flowers. See article Briar Croft, Sands Lane.

South Side Ė Market Garden land to Bretforton Boundary (Badsey Map W049)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their award, this piece of land was allotted to John Jones as his third allotment: "Also all that other Allotment or parcel of Land situate in Sand Field, Foxhill Field and Meerden Field, containing thirty-nine acres three roods and ten perches, bounded on the East part by the Parish of Bretforton, on the South side and part of the West by the second Allotment herein awarded to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessees the said John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter, on the remainder of the West by an old Inclosure called Abrahams Well Meadow, by the third Allotment herein awarded to the said Mary Harrington and others and given in Exchange to the said John Jones, and on the North side by old Inclosures and the third Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Byrd." After John Jonesí death in 1850, the land remained in the Jones family but was mortgaged to Henry Burlingham for £2000. Joseph Jones (Johnís nephew) defaulted on the mortgage and so the land was sold at auction on 7th July 1888 in five lots: Lots 12 and 13 called Bush Ground (10a 0r 10p and 2a 3r 34p of garden ground), Lot 14 called Twenty Lands (6a 1r 26p of garden ground), Lot 15 comprising three fields (Foxhill 9a 2r 0p of arable, 1a 0r 0p of pasture, Davidís Garden (1a 1r 8p of garden ground) and Lot 16 called Foxendean (7a 0r 14p of arable). By 1888, a private track had been built across the northern boundary in order that the tenants could access their land.

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 7 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.