Enclosure map project

Offenham Road (B4510), Aldington

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

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Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.

enclosure map

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photos: a6939 a6950 a6957

OFFENHAM ROAD B4510 (Aldington Map Parcel No K)

In 1807, this road was known as Littleton Turnpike Road. The Enclosure Commissioners stated in the Award Schedules: "And we the said Commissioners do hereby certify and declare that we have not diverted changed or altered any Turnpike Road leading into through and over the Hamlet of Aldington aforesaid but have left … the Turnpike Road leading from Bengworth to Littleton we have set out and continued also of the breadth of forty feet." A turnpike existed at the junction with Pitwell Road. It is now called Offenham Road because it is the road to Offenham. It forms part of the B4510 which runs from Evesham to North Littleton. The Aldington section of the road is just over half a mile long (965 metres).

Upper Dene (Aldington Map A021)

Until the early 19th century, this land was part of the common fields of Aldington. In 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this plot of land was allotted to Thomas Byrd as his first allotment: "To and for Thomas Bird, Gentleman, all those three several pieces or parcels of Land and hereinafter mentioned and described (that is to say), All that piece or parcel of Land situate in Newland Piece, Newland Butts, the Seven Lands, Styers Knap Furlong and places adjacent containing eighty acres two roods and fifteen perches, bounded on the North-East by Pitwell Road, on part of the East by the second Allotment, and on part of the South and on part of the East by the first Allotment herein Awarded to the said Edward Laugher, on other part of the South and on the remaining part of the East by the Allotment herein Awarded to the said Marchioness of Downshire and Sir John Dashwood King, Lessees as aforesaid, on other parts of the South and on parts of the West by Bengworth new Inclosures, and the remaining part of the West by the Littleton Turnpike Road. The Fences for inclosing the said Allotment are those on the North-East against Pitwell Road, those on the East at Newland Butts against the Allotment herein Awarded to the said Marchioness of Downshire and Sir John Dashwood King, Lessees as aforesaid, and those on the West against the last mentioned Turnpike Road." At some time in the 1870s, 12½ acres of the north-western part of the field was sold to Thomas Hale, on which he built a house and planted fruit trees. This house and land was sold at auction on 26th July 1915. Whilst the address of this house remains as Offenham Road, the land is now bisected by the Evesham bypass and the entrance on Offenham Road has now become obsolete; the property can only be accessed via the A46.

East – G & G Passantino Salad Producers (Aldington Map A022)

Until the early 19th century, this land was part of the common fields of Aldington. In 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this plot of land was allotted to Thomas Byrd as his second allotment: "Also that other piece or parcel of Land situate in Long Newland Furlong, Pitwell Furlong, Deadland Furlong, Wet Furrows and places adjacent, containing forty-six acres three roods and four perches bounded on the South-West by Pitwell Road, on the West by the Littleton Turnpike Road, and on all other parts and sides thereof by Allotments herein Awarded to the said George Day. The Fences for inclosing the said Allotment are those against Pitwell Road and Littleton Turnpike Road." It appears that James Ashwin acquired this land from Thomas Byrd some time soon after the Enclosure awards; it was definitely owned by the Ashwin family in 1846 when a plan was drawn up to show the proposed diversion of the road because of the building of the Oxford, Worcester & Wolverhampton Railway. In 1849, James Ashwin, Richard Ashwin and John Hall, as trustees of James Ashwin’s will, sold just over four acres to the railway company for £512 10s together with a further sum of £512 10s as compensation for the severance and other damage to the adjacent lands. The land remained in the Ashwin family until the latter part of the 20th century. Whilst most of the Ashwin property was sold in the 1950s, the fields and meadows were not sold until after the death of the last Squire, Harry Ashwin, in 1983; the Wheatleys, as tenants, bought the land.

East – Siding Nurseries (A008 and A009)

Until the early 19th century, this land was part of the common fields of Aldington. In 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, the southern part of what is now Siding Nurseries was on land which was allotted to George Day as his tithe allotment: "To and for George Day, Gentleman, who is or claims to be intitled to a certain small portion of Tythes issuing out of certain Lands in the Hamlet of Aldington in a field or furlong called Newland Fields, All that piece or parcel of Land situate in Wet Furrows Furlong and Deadland Furlong containing two acres two roods and twenty perches, bounded on the North and East by the first Allotment herein Awarded to the said George Day for the Farm, on the South by the second Allotment herein Awarded to the said Thomas Bird and on the West by the Littleton Turnpike Road. The Fences for inclosing the said Allotment are those on the South and West sides thereof." The northern part of what is now Siding Nurseries is on land which was allotted to George Day for the Farm as his first allotment: "To and for George Day, Gentleman, All those seven several pieces or parcels of Lands, Buildings and Premises next hereinafter mentioned and described (that is to say), All that piece or parcel of Land situate in Lower Hundred Lands, Long Headland Furlong, Town Meadow and places adjacent, containing seventy-two acres one rood and sixteen perches, bounded on part of the North and on part of the West by the Manorial Allotment herein Awarded to the said George Day, on the remaining part of the North and on the North-East by the Parish of Offenham, on the East by old Inclosures called the Pastures belonging to the said George Day, on part of the South by Homesteads and Orchards belonging to the said George Day and Philip Rock respectively, on other part of the West and on other part of the South by the Allotment herein Awarded to the said George Day for the Estate late Brooks’s, on other parts of the West and on other parts of the South by the second Allotment herein Awarded to the said Thomas Bird, on other part of the West and on the remaining part of the South by the Tithe Allotment herein Awarded to the said George Day and on the remaining part of the West by the Littleton Turnpike Road. The Fences for inclosing the said Allotment are those on the West against the Allotment herein Awarded to the said George Day for late Brooks, on all parts and sides against the second Allotment herein Awarded to the said Thomas Bird, on the West and South against the said Tithe Allotment herein Awarded to the said George Day, and on the West against the said Turnpike Road." On 6th October 1808, just two days after the Enclosure Awards, George Day sold this plot of land, together with all the estate bought from Lord Foley in 1805, to James Ashwin of Bretforton, for £12,000; the land remained in the Ashwin family until the latter part of the 20th century. Whilst most of the Ashwin property was sold in the 1950s, the fields and meadows were not sold until after the death of the last Squire, Harry Ashwin, in 1983; the Wheatleys, as tenants, bought the land.


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West - South Bank, Aldington Fruit Farm, Aldington Lodge (Aldington Map A024)

The entrance to Aldington Fruit Farm and Southbank, and the farm buildings, are in the parish of Bengeworth, but the house is in the parish of Aldington. Until the early 19th century, this land was part of the common fields of Aldington. In 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this plot of land was allotted to William Chambers as his first allotment: "To and for William Chambers, All those two pieces or parcels of Land next hereinafter mentioned and described (that is to say), All that piece or parcel of Land situate in Park Ditch Furlong and places adjacent, containing six acres three roods and twenty-three perches, bounded on parts of the North and North-East by the Allotment herein Awarded to John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter, Lessees as aforesaid, on part of the East by the Littleton Turnpike Road, on the remaining part of the East and on the South by Bengworth new Inclosures, and on the West by the Parks aforesaid. The Fences for inclosing the said Allotment are those against the Allotment Awarded to the said John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter as Lessees as aforesaid and against the said Turnpike Road." By 1855 (according to a map showing the neighbouring Christ Church land to the north) it was owned by Mr Cartwright. Aldington Lodge was built on the northern part of the land in the late 1850s and was owned by the Horsman family for over 50 years. The Reverend Thomas Clark, who owned the neighbouring land to the north and west, bought a small piece on the western side in the late 19th century. He then sold this, along with some of his other land, at an auction at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham, in 1892. It comprised Lot 16 and was called Little Pool Close (2a 2r 30p).

West - Aldington Lodge front garden, Railway line, Bypass Nurseries (Aldington Map A007)

Until the early 19th century, this land was part of the common fields of Aldington. In 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this plot of land was allotted to the lessees of the Dean and Chapter of Christ Church: "To and for John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter, widow, who are intitled as Lessees under the said Dean and Chapter to all other their Great Tythes arising and continuing within the said Hamlet of Aldington for the remainder of a term of twenty-one years, All that piece or parcel of Land situate in the Furze Furlong, Broad Furze Leys, Aldington Common and places adjacent, containing fifty-five acres one rood and twenty-four perches, bounded on the South by the first and on the North by the second Allotment herein Awarded to the said William Chambers, on the East by the Littleton Turnpike Road, and on the West by the Parks aforesaid. The Fences for inclosing the said Allotment are those on the East against the said Turnpike Road." William Chambers, who was allotted the land to the north and the south, was tenant to Ann Slatter. From at least 1819, it was let to William and Henry Haywood and the under-tenant was Thomas Pratt. An 1826 valuation by Christ Church described it as "superior allotment in seven closes well fenced adjoining good road, no buildings". In 1840, the lease fee was increased by two and a half times any former renewal, and Benjamin and Henry Workman wrote to Dr John Bull, the Dean of Christ Church, on behalf of Messrs Haywood, stating, "There are no buildings on the land which, at no distant period, was overrun with gorse". Later that year, a barn was built by Charles Stockford who then leased the land; it was then let to Richard Baldwyn and in 1849 to John Clark. In the early 1850s, the Oxford, Worcester & Wolverhampton Railway was built across the middle of the land, effectively splitting it into two halves. Just over 6 acres of land was taken for the railway and an 1855 valuation shows that the estate now comprised 49a 1r 6p. The land described as west (which we would consider to be south) of the railway was divided into three fields and the land described as east (which we would consider to be north) of the railway was divided into five fields. Field 1, south of the railway, upon which the drive and front garden of Aldington Lodge is now situated, comprising 2a 0r 0p, was occupied by Mr Cartwright (who owned the neighbouring plot of land on which the house was built) and used as pasture. It is likely that the owners of Aldington Lodge bought the land to the east to enlarge the grounds in 1892 when most of the fields were sold. The greenhouses which are north of the railway, are on land which comprised Field 7 in 1855, and their entrance was in Field 8. In 1857, John Clark’s son, the Reverend Thomas Humphris Clark, took over the lease. Christ Church felt that as Clark owned The Parks, the neighbouring estate, he would be willing to buy their land. It was all arable except two acres and was well suited for garden ground, but had been valued by Francis Field as agricultural ground. Clark bought the land in 1871 for £6,000, then described as Aldington Leys but later in the century as Christ Church Ground (comprising eight arable fields and one pasture). In 1892, Reverend Clark sold the land south of the railway in three lots: Lot 13 Christ Church Little Barn Ground (3a 1r 0p) and Lots 14 and 15 Christ Church Great Barn Ground (4a 0r 27p and 6a 0r 16p). Clark died in 1913 and the five fields north of the railway, together with the remainder of The Parks estate, were sold by auction at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham, on 29th June 1914. The greenhouses are situated on land which spans Lots 4 and 5.

West - Betta Bedding (Aldington Map A025)

Until the early 19th century, this land was part of the common fields of Aldington. In 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, William Chambers was allotted this plot of land as his second allotment: "And all that piece or parcel of Land situate in the furlong below Furze Furlong, Aldington Common and places adjacent, containing nineteen acres and twenty-four perches, bounded on part of the North by the Allotment herein Awarded for the Tithe of Wool and Lamb, on part of the East and other parts of the North by the second Allotment herein Awarded to the said Curate as aforesaid, on the remaining part of the North by the Allotment herein Awarded to Philip Rock, on the remaining part of the East by the Littleton Turnpike Road, on the South by the Allotment herein Awarded to the said John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter, Lessees as aforesaid, and on the West by the Farm called the Parks." It was later bought by John Procter (who owned the neighbouring Parks Estate) some time early in the 19th century as, by the time that John’s nephew, John Clark, bought the neighbouring plot to the north in 1847, it was described as "heretofore belonging to William Chambers but now to the devisees of the late John Procter Esquire". John Clark then sold it to his son Procter, and it then passed to Procter and brother Thomas. In 1914 it was sold at auction at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham, on 29th June. It comprised Lot 6 (Little Chambers Ground) and Lot 7 (Great Chambers Ground), Lot 7 being the portion on which the depot (occupied by Betta Bedding) is situated.

West - Nurseries (Aldington Map A026)

Until the early 19th century, this land was part of the common fields of Aldington. In 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, Philip Rock was allotted this plot of land: "To and for Philip Rock, All that piece or parcel of Land situate in the Lower Broadleys Meadow, Fawk Mill Furlong and places adjacent, containing twelve acres and eight perches, bounded on part of the North by the Parish of Offenham, on the East by the Littleton Turnpike Road, on the South by the second Allotment herein Awarded to the said William Chambers and on parts of the West and on the remaining part of the North by the second Allotment herein Awarded to the said Curate as aforesaid, which said Allotment the said Commissioners do hereby declare, adjudge and determine to be a fair, just and reasonable compensation and satisfaction to the said Philip Rock for his Estate and right of Common thereto belonging in, over and upon the Lands by the said Act directed to be divided and Inclosed. The Fences for inclosing the said Allotment are those on the East and South sides thereof." Philip Rock died in 1831, a bachelor, and his estates passed to his two brothers, John and Thomas, who received a half share in "the messuage, buildings, farm and lands at Offenham and Aldington". The tenant in the 1840s was William Bolton. The land was sold to John Clark in 1847 after the deaths of John and Thomas in 1846 and 1844 respectively. John's son, Procter Clark, then bought the land from his father in 1855. After Procter's untimely death in 1856, it passed back to John Clark, who then sold it to his eldest son, the Reverend Thomas Humphris Clark. In 1892, Clark sold part of The Parks Estate, including this land, at a sale at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham. Lot 11 was called Rocks Meadow (2a 2r 3p) and Lot 12 was called Rocks Ground (10a 0r 25p). By 1914, when the adjoining land to the south was sold, it was in the ownership of Mr F Haines. In the northern section of this field, just south of the brook, there is a gate at the entrance to a track and a red sign saying "Footpath closed", but this has never been a public right of way.

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 7 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.