Enclosure map project

Mill Lane, Badsey

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.
enclosure map

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photos: a7092 a7230

MILL LANE

This road is shown on the Badsey Enclosure Map of 1812 but is not included in the Award Schedules. It is assumed that this was because it was in an area where all the land was old enclosures. In the 18th century, there was a tendency to accept the layout of rights of way and to design the new enclosures within that framework. The road gets its name from the mill or mills which stood by Badsey Brook for several centuries, firstly two Corn Mills, then one Corn Mill, then a Silk Mill, and then converted to residential accommodation in 1864. An Indenture of 1774 states "there is a way or passage to and from the mill called Badsey Mill towards the street". In the 1891 and 1901 census the road was called Mill Lane but on the Ordnance Survey maps of 1923 and 1938, the road is named as Silk Mills Lane, but by 1963 it had reverted to the name of Mill Lane.

At the entrance to the lane, there are some very old cottages (Vicarage Cottage and Glebe Cottage on the east and Barn Cottage and Orchard Cottage on the west). In the 19th century, Vicarage Cottage and Glebe Cottage were often deemed to be part of Village Street (High Street). Field Cottage appears to have been added on, in the early part of the 19th century, at the rear of old cottages in the High Street. The rest of the housing (three detached houses, two detached chalet bungalows, two semi-detached houses and two semi-detached bungalows) in the road dates from the latter part of the 20th century. None of the houses in Mill Lane have numbers, with the exception of Silk Mill Cottages (numbers 1 and 2 being 1970s semi-detached bungalows and Numbers 3 - 6 being a 1970s refurbishment of the old mill). Until the 1960s, a large barn stood on the western side of the lane, in close proximity to Barn Cottage.

See article Mill at Badsey.


Old Barn on Mill Lane

East Side - Vicarage Cottage (Badsey Map G002)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Ann White, widow (Ann was born Ann Smith, and is believed to be the aunt of Anthony Smith who owned the Mill at the time of Enclosure). It was a house and garden and amounted to 0a 0r 4p. In earlier times, it had been the home of the Badsey family, who derived their surname from the village in which they lived for several centuries. In 1867, it became part of Badsey Glebe, having previously been owned by William Cook for about ten years. It remained the property of Christ Church until the latter part of the 20th century.

East Side - Glebe Cottage (Badsey Map G003)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Hopeful Skinner. It was a house and garden and amounted to 0a 0r 5p. It was bought by the Reverend Thomas Hunt for Badsey Glebe in the early 1860s. It remained the property of Christ Church until the latter part of the 20th century.


Glebe Cottage & Vicarage Cottage about 1960

East Side - Sunlea, Brookside House, Nevrin (Badsey Map G004)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Anthony Smith. It was called Mill Orchard and amounted to 0a 2r 0p. In earlier times, it had belonged to the Badsey family, who derived their surname from the village in which they lived for several centuries. The orchard was in the ownership of Richard Badsey in 1747, but was then bought by Edward Wilson. Edward Wilson sold the orchard to Joseph Smith in 1774. Anthony Smith (Joseph’s son) sold the orchard, along with the Mill, in 1818 to John Thorp, a silk manufacturer from Coventry. It remained in the Thorp family until 1864 when it was put up for sale. The Reverend Thomas Hunt was keen to buy it as glebe land, as it backed on to the Parsonage garden. In December 1863, Hunt wrote to Christ Church to say that the orchard had reached a figure of £165; the Chapter had offered £105 and he wished to borrow the remaining £60. It remained part of Badsey Glebe until the 1960s when it was sold for housing development and Sunlea and Brookside House were built; Nevrin was built in 1994.

East Side - Silk Mill Cottages 1, Silk Mill Cottages 2 (Badsey Map G005)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Anthony Smith. On the northern part of the plot was the water corn mill and house; the whole plot amounted to 0a 2r 38p. The mill (or mills, as had originally been the case) had been in the Smith family for several generations, certainly from before 1747, which is the earliest surviving Indenture, when Ann Smith, widow, mortgaged the Mill: "All that one Water Corn Mill being formerly called two Water Corn Mills with the Appurtenances together with the Messuage Tenement or Dwelling House therein so adjoining and belonging commonly called or known by the Name of Badsey Mills and all the Gears Stones Tools and Implements of in about and belonging to the same Mills and also all that piece or parcel of Garden Ground lying near unto the said Mills commonly called or known by the name of Swan’s Nest being encompassed about with the Mill Pond." Anthony Smith sold the mill, along with the orchard and meadow, in 1818 to John Thorp, a silk manufacturer from Coventry. He built a new Silk Mill to the west of the old mill. The land remained in the Thorp family until 1864 when it was sold to William Parker the younger who converted both mills into residential accommodation, making a row of nine cottages. During a refurbishment programme in the 1970s, the five cottages at the eastern end (on the site of the old corn mill) were pulled down. Two new bungalows (numbers 1 and 2 Silk Mill Cottages) were built south of the original mill on the garden ground known as Swan’s Nest.


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West Side - Silk Mill Cottages 3-6 (Badsey Map G006)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Anthony Smith. It was the Mill Meadow and amounted to 1a 0r 18p. It had been in the Smith family for several generations, certainly from before 1747, which is the earliest surviving Indenture, when Ann Smith, widow, mortgaged the Mill and land; this meadow land was referred to as The Naite. The Enclosure Map shows how the brook was diverted at the Mill Bridge on Badsey Lane so that it could run due south to pass through the middle of the mill building; the 1967 Ordnance Survey map shows this still in existence. Anthony Smith sold the meadow, along with the adjoining mill and orchard, in 1818 to John Thorp, a silk manufacturer from Coventry. John Thorp then erected a Silk Mill on the centre of this piece of land, adjoining the old Corn Mill. It remained in the Thorp family until 1864 when William Parker Junior bought the land and converted the Mills into cottages. The cottages in the Silk Mill were refurbished in the 1970s whilst the ones in the old mill to the east were pulled down.

West Side – Spring Vale, Bennachie, Haze, Millmead, Orchard Cottage, Barn Cottage (Badsey Map G007)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Edward Savage. It was described as a house and homestead and amounted to 1a 0r 14p. The land passed by inheritance to Edward’s great-nephew, Edward Appelbee. In 1864 Thomas Appelbee (Edward's son) attempted to sell the land. But it was not until 1877 that it was sold to Charlotte Lord, described as "an orchard called Mill Orchard, a barn, buildings and stable", together with "two cottages adjoining the last mentioned barn and orchard" (these cottages are the present-day Barn and Orchard Cottage). The property and land became part of what was known as the Wickhamford estate (although it covered land in Badsey, Aldington and Bengeworth, as well as Wickhamford), which had been acquired by Charlotte’s husband, John Pickup Lord, who had died four months earlier. It remained in the Lord family until 1930 when it was put up for auction and formed lot 31.

West Side - Field Cottage (Badsey Map G008)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Thomas Knight. It was a house and garden (the present-day 46 & 48 High Street) and amounted to 0a 0r 35p. In the early 19th century, a further cottage (Field Cottage) was added at the rear. By the end of the 19th century, Field Cottage, plus the adjoining cottages, were often referred to as Mill Cottages. At some stage during the 19th century, they were bought either by the Reverend Thomas Williams or by Joseph Woodward. They were in Joseph Woodward's ownership when he sold them at auction (lot 8) in 1866. They were bought by John Pickup Lord; he died in 1877, but his executors administered the estate for some time. By the early 20th century, Field Cottage and its neighbours were in the ownership of Richard Pendlebury and then passed by inheritance to his daughter, Maud Newbury. Maud Newbury sold Field Cottage (referred to then as 4 Mill Cottages) to the Tucker family in 1953.


Knife Sharpener working at the end of Mill Lane.

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 7 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.