Enclosure map project

Main Street, Aldington (including Pitwell Lane)

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.

enclosure map

OpenStreetMap


Manor Court


Corner Cottage & Corner House



Looking down the hill


Looking up the hill


Elm Cottage


Tower View


Beeholme


Bereta


Leaving the village looking NE

Photos taken 2006/7. Aerial photos: a6960 a6972 a7150 a7152

MAIN STREET (Aldington Map Parcel No A)

This road is so-called because it is the main road in Aldington but, in 1807, when the Aldington Enclosure Map was drawn, it was known as Pitwell Road. It was described thus: "One Public Carriage Road and Highway of the breadth of thirty feet branching out of the Turnpike Road leading from Bengworth to Littleton at or near Bowheadland Furlong and passing thence in an Eastward direction along its usual track through and over the said Common fields to the Village of Aldington and hereinafter called Pitwell Road." It ran from the current-day Offenham Road to the centre of Aldington; it then split, one branch going north along the current-day Chapel Lane and one branch going east along the current-day Mill Lane. In the mid 19th century, the most north-westerly section of the road was stopped up when the Oxford, Worcester & Wolverhampton Railway was built over the land. Access to the Littleton Turnpike Road (Offenham Road) was thereafter by means of a new road constructed (Siding Road) which took a more westerly direction. This map drawn up by the Road Surveyor in 1846 shows the planned diversion.

Donald Wasley, who grew up in Aldington between the wars, records that as children, they referred to the part of the road from the corner at the centre of the village to the brow of the hill as The Street; the section of the road that led from the brow of the hill to Aldington Siding and the Evesham/Offenham Road was known as Offenham Road. See Letters from Don Wasley (1918 - 2000) and Roy Page about life in Badsey and Aldington.

For several hundred years, Main Street, together with Village Street, has been where the most of the housing in the village is concentrated. Three houses still exist on the north side which date back to the 17th/18th centuries. There were also several cottages in existence on the south side in 1808 but these were pulled down in the 19th century. Except for the building of two pairs of semi-detached cottages in the 1850s, further development did not take place until the 20th century. In the last decade, mobile homes have begun springing up at the western end of the road. The village pump was situated at the intersection of Main Street with Village Street. Children living in Aldington in the mid 20th century still referred to the area as "the pump" but it had disappeared some considerable time before. A seat now marks the spot where it once stood.

This photograph of Main Street, looking west, was taken about 1900. It shows the fence forming the boundary of Little Orchard, belonging to the Manor, on the left, and The White House and Elm Cottage on the right.

North – The Old Stables, Corner Cottage, Corner House, The Old Cider Mill (Aldington Map Z028)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by George Day. It was referred to as Homestead late Brookes and amounted to 0a 1r 25p. Behind was a further plot of land (Z029) amounting to 1a 0r 8p, described as Orchard late Brookes. The Brooke family had lived in Aldington at the beginning of the 18th century. Benjamin Brooke (1690-1762), who inherited the property, had moved to London as a young man. In 1770, Thomas Laugher, on behalf of Thomas Lord Foley, bought all of the Brookes’ estate for £432 from Robert Aisley, the grandson of Benjamin Brooke, thus adding the house, garden and 30 acres of land to Foley’s portfolio of property in Aldington. George Day bought the majority of Lord Foley’s estate in 1805 for £7,000. On 6th October 1808, just two days after the Enclosure Awards, George Day sold this plot of land, together with all the estate bought from Lord Foley, to James Ashwin of Bretforton, for £12,000; the land remained in the Ashwin family until the middle of the 20th century. At some time during the 19th century, stables for the Manor House opposite were built on the southern part of the land. The Old Stables were sold with the Manor House in the 1950s to Mr Jerrim from Birmingham, who then sold to B Brazier in the 1960s; it was converted into residential accommodation about 1980. Corner Cottage and Corner House (the original Brooke farmhouse) have been occupied by the same family since the 1850s, originally as tenants, but subsequently as owner once the cottages began to be sold off by the Ashwins in the 1950s. At the time that the Enclosure Map was drawn, the building which housed the cider mill was in existence. By the time of the 1883 Ordnance Survey map, a building had been built which joined the cider mill with the house; it was marked as a smithy. From parish records, it would appear that there was no resident blacksmith, and this is confirmed by A H Savory in his book, "Grain and Chaff from an English Manor", who wrote, "Our blacksmith came twice a week to the village when work was still plentiful in the early days of my farming, and I was not yet the only practical farmer in the place." In the inter-war years, Mr Butler, the tenant of the Manor, had a garage where he kept his car. The old cider mill was converted to a dwelling in the late 20th century.

North – Fairfield, 10, The Singlet, The White House (Aldington Map A011)

This plot of land originally belonged to the Reverend Thomas Williams and comprised a house which is today known as The White House, and various out-buildings. In June 1806, a full year before the Aldington Enclosure Act was passed, George Day, who owned the neighbouring land, entered into an agreement with the Reverend Thomas Williams: ". after reciting that the said Thomas Williams and George Day had each of them freehold estates in Aldington aforesaid and that the said Thomas Williams had also freehold estates in the parishes of Offenham and Badsey in the county of Worcester part of which lay adjoining to the estate of the said George Day situate in the hamlet of Aldington and reciting that the proprietors of lands in the hamlet of Aldington had it in contemplation to inclose the open and common fields and other commonable and waste land within the said hamlet and in case the said inclosure should take effect it would be much to the advantage of the said Thomas Williams and George Day to make exchanges of part of their said estates it was mutually agreed by and between the said parties thereto and their respective heirs executors and administrators that in case the said Inclosure should take effect the said Thomas Williams should receive in exchange for his lands in Aldington so much of the under-mentioned lands of the said George Day as should in the judgement of the Commissioner or Commissioners to be appointed for making the said Inclosure be a full equivalent to the said Thomas Williams for the lands and hereditaments in the said hamlet of Aldington …". In 1808, when the Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, the exchange with the Reverend Thomas Williams was formally agreed and this plot of land was allotted to George Day for the Farm as his third allotment: "Also all that Messuage, Barn, Stable and Buildings situate in the Village of Aldington aforesaid, together with the sites thereof, Foldyard, Garden and Orchard thereto adjoining and belonging, containing two acres and seven perches, bounded on the North by the first Allotment herein Awarded to the said George Day for the Farm, on the East by an Orchard and Homestead called late Brooks’s belonging to the said George Day, on the South by a Lane or Street in the Village of Aldington, and on the West by the Homestead and Orchard belonging to the said Philip Rock … which said Messuage, Barn, Stable and Buildings together with the sites thereof, Foldyard, Garden and Orchard thereto adjoining and belonging … are set out, allotted and Awarded as aforesaid by and with the consent and approbation of the said Thomas Williams, testified by his signing and sealing these presents as well as by an Agreement between him and the said George Day bearing date on or about the twenty-seventh day of June in the year of our Lord 1806." On 6th October 1808, just two days after the Enclosure Awards, George Day sold this plot of land, together with all the estate bought from Lord Foley in 1805, to James Ashwin of Bretforton, for £12,000; the land remained in the Ashwin family until the middle of the 20th century. The eastern part of the land was sold to Evesham Rural District Council and a pair of semi-detached houses (Fairfield and 10) for Council workers was built in the 1950s. The Singlet was built as a private development. The White House was sold in the 1950s.

North – Fircroft (previously Claremont), Elm Cottage (Aldington Map Z021)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by Philip Rock which had been bequeathed to him by his father, Philip Rock. It was referred to as a homestead and orchard and amounted to 0a 0r 3p and was just south of a slightly larger area owned by Philip Rock amounting to 0a 3r 5p (Z020). In 1814, Philip Rock sold for £335 all his property and land in the centre of Aldington to James Ashwin who owned the neighbouring land. It was described as, "All that messuage cottage or tenement with the garden and orchard adjoining thereto and also all that other orchard situate and being opposite the said cottage or tenement containing in the whole two acres late in the occupation of Philip Rock but now of Richard Gibb." The Enclosure awards simply refer to a homestead, whereas the 1814 document refers to a messuage, so it is assumed that the messuage in question is the current-day Elm Cottage. After the sale of The White House in the 1950s, part of the land to the west was sold and Fircroft was built.

North – Middlebank (Aldington Map A014)

At the beginning of the 19th century, the plot of land on which Middlebank is situated, was an old enclosure belonging to Edward Laugher and comprised a Blacksmith’s shop and house. George Day owned all the surrounding land and, in 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, he was allotted this property as his sixth allotment for the Farm: "Also all that Blacksmith’s Shop and part House situate in or near the Village of Aldington aforesaid together with the site thereof, bounded on the West and North by the Allotment Awarded to the said George Day for late Brookes’s, on the East by a Cottage Garden belonging to the said George Day, and on the South by Pitwell Road aforesaid, the said Messuage, Garden, Blacksmith’s Shop and part House being Awarded as aforesaid by the said Commissioners by and with the consent of the said Edward Laugher testified by his signing and sealing these presents." On 6th October 1808, just two days after the Enclosure Awards, George Day sold this plot of land, together with all the estate bought from Lord Foley in 1805, to James Ashwin of Bretforton, for £12,000; the land remained in the Ashwin family until the middle of the 20th century. Middlebank was built in the grounds of the neighbouring Elm Cottage in 1973.

North – The Swallows, Bereta, Mobile Homes, Sytchwythy, Wells Brook Farm (Aldington Map A022)

Until the early 19th century, this land was part of the common fields of Aldington. In 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this plot of land was allotted to Thomas Byrd as his second allotment: "Also that other piece or parcel of Land situate in Long Newland Furlong, Pitwell Furlong, Deadland Furlong, Wet Furrows and places adjacent, containing forty-six acres three roods and four perches bounded on the South-West by Pitwell Road, on the West by the Littleton Turnpike Road, and on all other parts and sides thereof by Allotments herein Awarded to the said George Day. The Fences for inclosing the said Allotment are those against Pitwell Road and Littleton Turnpike Road." It appears that James Ashwin acquired this land from Thomas Byrd some time soon after the Enclosure awards; it was definitely owned by the Ashwin family in 1846 when a plan was drawn up to show the proposed diversion of the road because of the building of the Oxford, Worcester & Wolverhampton Railway. In 1849, James Ashwin, Richard Ashwin and John Hall, as trustees of James Ashwin’s will, sold just over four acres from this field and an adjacent field to the railway company for £512 10s together with a further sum of £512 10s as compensation for the severance and other damage to the adjacent lands. Development along this section of the road did not begin until the mid 20th century with the building of Bereta in the 1950s, on a piece of land then owned by the Osborne family. In 2005, The Swallows was built in the grounds of Bereta.


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South – Manor Court (Aldington Map Z010)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by George Day. It amounted to 1a 1r 2p and comprised the farmhouse and out-houses belonging to Aldington Farm. George Day had bought the Aldington Farm estate and Brooke’s Farm estate from Thomas Lord Foley in 1805 for £7,000. Aldington Farm had been in Lord Foley’s family for 140 years, an earlier Thomas Foley of Witley having bought "all that Manor of Aldington alias Aunton, and all that farm called Aunton Farm now in the tenure of William Jarrett, gentleman" in 1665. Manor Court forms the original farmhouse. On 6th October 1808, just two days after the Enclosure Awards, George Day sold the farmhouse, together with all the estate bought from Lord Foley in 1805, to James Ashwin of Bretforton, for £12,000. Soon after acquiring the property, James Ashwin extended the house considerably. The 19th century extension is today called The Manor House, with a postal address of Village Street (although the Electoral Roll has it listed as Main Street), whilst the original part is in Main Street. This auction shows the sale of goods after the death of Richard Ashwin in 1866, the last Ashwin to occupy the Manor. The land remained in the Ashwin family until the middle of the 20th century. It was then sold to Mr Jerrim, a Birmingham businessman, who bought all the land on the east side of Village Street as far as the Badsey Road. He died intestate and the land was sold off to have a fair distribution in the family. The whole of the Manor, plus the Coach House opposite and gardens were bought by B Brazier in the 1960s. The present owners of Manor Court have lived there since 1990.

South – Chryton, Magnolia House, Mellowstone (Aldington Map Z022)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by Philip Rock. It amounted to 0a 1r 36p. In 1814, Philip Rock sold for £335 all his property and land in the centre of Aldington to James Ashwin who owned the neighbouring land. It was described as, "… and also all that other orchard situate and being opposite the said cottage or tenement containing in the whole two acres late in the occupation of Philip Rock but now of Richard Gibb." The land remained in the Ashwin family until the 1960s when B Brazier bought the plot on which he built Mellowstone. Two further bungalows, Chryton and Magnolia House, were built at a later date.

South – Butterley House, Pennyfields, Green Bank, Vale View, Half Acre, Lokos, The Furrows, Highlands, Treetops, Tower View (formerly Castle Gay), Beeholme, Orchard View, Aldington Land Management Land, Mobile Homes (Aldington Map A021)

Until the early 19th century, this land was part of the common fields of Aldington. In 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this plot of land was allotted to Thomas Byrd as his first allotment: "To and for Thomas Bird, Gentleman, all those three several pieces or parcels of Land and hereinafter mentioned and described (that is to say), All that piece or parcel of Land situate in Newland Piece, Newland Butts, the Seven Lands, Styers Knap Furlong and places adjacent containing eighty acres two roods and fifteen perches, bounded on the North-East by Pitwell Road, on part of the East by the second Allotment, and on part of the South and on part of the East by the first Allotment herein Awarded to the said Edward Laugher, on other part of the South and on the remaining part of the East by the Allotment herein Awarded to the said Marchioness of Downshire and Sir John Dashwood King, Lessees as aforesaid, on other parts of the South and on parts of the West by Bengworth new Inclosures, and the remaining part of the West by the Littleton Turnpike Road. The Fences for inclosing the said Allotment are those on the North-East against Pitwell Road, those on the East at Newland Butts against the Allotment herein Awarded to the said Marchioness of Downshire and Sir John Dashwood King, Lessees as aforesaid, and those on the West against the last mentioned Turnpike Road." In the 1850s, Thomas Byrd (1795-1865) erected two pairs of semi-detached cottages (the present-day Half Acre and Lokos) on the north-eastern section of this field. The cottages remained in the Byrd family until the early 1920s when a number of Byrd properties were sold after the death of Thomas Byrd (1836-1919), the grandson of the Thomas Byrd mentioned in the Award Schedules. They were bought by John Byrd (no relation) but were sold to individual owners later in the 20th century. The neighbouring section of the field to the west was bought by Ted Ballard where he built his house, Beeholme, on the brow of the hill, about 1910. Orchard View was built a little later. Following the death of Ted Ballard, the house and large garden was sold and three more houses (Highlands, Treetops and Tower View) were built in the triangle of land to the east. The land to the east of the cottages was known as Byrd’s Orchard. In 1929, Thomas Byrd (1879-1934) leased the land to John Byrd and Harry Byrd (no relations). In 1950, this plot was sold to Evesham Rural District Council and Pennyfields and Green Bank were built for Council employees. Butterley House and Vale View were subsequently built in the gardens of Pennyfields and Green Bank respectively. Just west of the present line of development, a group of Aldington residents have bought a field for the benefit of the community. Further west, there are a number of mobile homes.

South – Mileaway (Aldington Map A027)

Until the early 19th century, this land was part of the common fields of Aldington. In 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, this plot of land was allotted to Edward Laugher as his first allotment: "To and for Edward Laugher, All those three pieces and parcels of Land next hereinafter mentioned and described (that is to say), All that piece or parcel of Land situate in Newland Butts, Newland Pieces and places adjacent, containing six acres one rood and thirty perches, bounded on part of the West and on part of the North by the first Allotment herein Awarded to the said Thomas Bird, on the North-East, on other part of the North by the second Allotment and an Orchard belonging to the said Edward Laugher, on part of the East and other part of the North by a Garden herein Awarded to the said Edward Laugher, on other part of the East by the Homestead herein Awarded to the said Curate, on the remaining part of the East by an ancient Lane in or near the Village of Aldington aforesaid, and on the South by Allotments herein Awarded to the said Curate as aforesaid and the said Marchioness of Downshire and Sir John Dashwood King respectively as Lessees as aforesaid. The Fences for inclosing the said Allotment are those on the North and West against the first Allotment herein Awarded to the said Thomas Bird." In 1813, John Procter exchanged land in Badsey with all of the land that Edward Laugher owned in Aldington and became the owner of this piece of land in Newland Butts and Newland Piece, together with Edward Laugher’s adjoining fields: a piece of land in Newland Butts (2a 0r 33p, map reference A028), a garden which had previously belonged to William Chambers (0a 0r 20p, map reference A029), and an old enclosure which was an orchard (0a 2r 34p, map reference Z023). The land passed by inheritance to the Reverend Thomas Humphris Clark, who sold the land in 1885 to Thomas Byrd; it was then used as pasture. It is believed that the land was then sold or leased to John Byrd (no relation) after the death of Thomas Byrd in 1919.

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 7 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.