Enclosure map project

The Hop Gardens, Aldington

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.

enclosure map

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photo: a7154

THE HOP GARDENS

The Hop Gardens is a development of six detached houses built in the 1970s on the site of the old Ivy House which was demolished shortly before to make way for the new houses. Rather confusingly, the eastern half of the ancient semi-detached cottage, Ivy Cottage, was also given the postal address of The Hop Gardens, whilst the western half was given the postal address of Chapel Street. After Ivy Cottage, the numbering then goes in a clockwise direction, numbers 1-6.

The road is so called because hops were grown in Aldington at the end of the 19th century. Arthur Savory, who was tenant farmer at the Manor from 1873 to 1901, introduced hops. The Parish Council, however, erroneously called the road The Hop Gardens (this is the name used in Kent, whereas in Worcestershire, they are called Hop Yards); or possibly they felt that garden sounded better than yard!

Here is more information about the planning application. [To be added.]

1, 2, 3, 4 (Aldington Map Z012)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by Thomas Byrd. It amounted to 2a 3r 39p. This comprised farmland adjacent to his house, Ivy House. It remained in the Byrd family until the early 1920s when most of the land was sold after the death of Thomas Byrd (1836-1919), the grandson of the Thomas Byrd mentioned in the Award Schedules. It was bought by John Byrd (no relation). The Byrd family still own some of this land, but a small portion was sold for development of The Hop Gardens.

Ivy Cottage, 5, 6 (Aldington Map Z013)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by Thomas Byrd. It amounted to 0a 2r 21p and comprised his residence, Ivy House, Ivy Cottage for his farm-workers, and farmyard buildings. The house, farm and cottages remained in the Byrd family until the early 1920s when a number of Byrd properties were sold after the death of Thomas Byrd (1836-1919), the grandson of the Thomas Byrd mentioned in the Award Schedules. The property was bought by John Byrd (no relation). Ivy House was demolished about 1970 and the land sold for development of The Hop Gardens, but Ivy Cottages were allowed to remain.


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1, 2, 3, 4 (Aldington Map Z012)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by Thomas Byrd. It amounted to 2a 3r 39p. This comprised farmland adjacent to his house, Ivy House. It remained in the Byrd family until the early 1920s when most of the land was sold after the death of Thomas Byrd (1836-1919), the grandson of the Thomas Byrd mentioned in the Award Schedules. It was bought by John Byrd (no relation). The Byrd family still own some of this land, but a small portion was sold for development of The Hop Gardens.

Ivy Cottage, 5, 6 (Aldington Map Z013)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by Thomas Byrd. It amounted to 0a 2r 21p and comprised his residence, Ivy House, Ivy Cottage for his farm-workers, and farmyard buildings. The house, farm and cottages remained in the Byrd family until the early 1920s when a number of Byrd properties were sold after the death of Thomas Byrd (1836-1919), the grandson of the Thomas Byrd mentioned in the Award Schedules. The property was bought by John Byrd (no relation). Ivy House was demolished about 1970 and the land sold for development of The Hop Gardens, but Ivy Cottages were allowed to remain.

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 7 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.