Enclosure map project

High Street, Badsey
(including Cedar Court, Orchard Way, Poplar Court)

Badsey website home page

Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.
enclosure map

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photos: a6980 a7115 a7127 a7230

HIGH STREET

This road is shown on the Badsey Enclosure Map of 1812 but is not included in the Award Schedules. In the 18th century, there was a tendency to accept the layout of rights of way and to design the new enclosures within that framework. It is assumed that the road was not specifically mentioned as it was in an area comprising all old enclosures. It was the centre of Badsey where originally all the housing was concentrated.

In the 1851 census, it was referred to simply as Street; in 1881 and 1891 it was referred to as Village Street, but in various 20th century deeds it was referred to as Main Street. By 1903 it was being known as High Street, as Edgar Cull’s address in the School Admissions Register is given as High Street.

Numbering was assigned in the 1950s. On the west side, there is no number 2 High Street (this number was assigned to the former Manor Coach House, converted into residential accommodation in 1951 but demolished in 1987 to make way for Manorside), or number 24 (the number given to Seward House, which has since been made into four residences with the numbers 24A, 24B, 24C, 24D). On the east side, there are no numbers 13 or 15. It was not until the latter part of the 20th century that a pavement was put along both sides of the road.

East Side – Cedar Court Numbers 1-8 (Badsey Map G031)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure comprising a house and homestead (the present-day Oakleigh House and Oakleigh Cottage in Old Post Office Lane) of 0a 1r 12p which belonged to Samuel Sheppard. Cedar Court was built in the 1970s in the back garden of this plot as a development of eight terraced houses (two blocks of four). It has a postal address of High Street, but is not part of the High Street numbering system as High Street numbering starts south of the present-day Old Post Office Lane.

East Side – 1, 3 (Badsey Map G035)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to William Wilson. It was called Upper Orchard and amounted to 1a 0r 32p; William Wilson also owned the cottage opposite (the present-day Hollywood Villa). William Wilson died in 1818 and it passed by inheritance to his son, William George Wilson. In 1842, William Junior sold this and all his other land to James Ashwin of Bretforton. Shortly after this, James Ashwin then sold the land to Edward Appelbee who lived opposite the orchard at Harrington House. Upper Orchard was sold as part of the Harrington House estate by the trustees of the will of Thomas Appelbee and his sister, Mrs William Gibbs (Edward Appelbee’s children), at a sale at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham, on 6th July 1891. It was bought by Arthur Jones, who then sold it to Edward Johns in 1921 (the Johns family had been tenants since 1887). It remained in the Johns family until 1964 when it was sold for housing development.

East Side – Orchard Way, 5 (Badsey Map G036), 7 (Badsey Map G037), 9 (Badsey Map G038)

Orchard Way has a postal address of High Street and has High Street numbering, being numbers 5, 7 and 9, but the houses are actually down a path known as Orchard Way to the east of the High Street at the start of The Lankets. At the time of the 1891 census, this path was known as Phipps Alley or John Phipps Alley, because John Phipps, who lived at the present-day 11 High Street, owned one of the cottages which had been divided into two and also the house beyond, which is now number 14 Old Post Office Lane. By 1901, with John Phipps dead, the cottages were no longer identified as Phipps Alley. According to a map of 1921 relating to the nearby Harrington House and Hollywood Villa, they were then owned by Joseph Cull. At the time of the Electoral Register of 1924, the cottages were identified as The Alley (rather confusingly, this was a name more commonly given to the cottages running in a parallel line to the south, at least in the 1930s and 1940s). The three cottages date back to about the 17th century. The present-day number 5 was, in 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, owned by John Jones of Abberley (0a 0r 14p). The present-day number 7 was owned by Elizabeth Mason (0a 0r 2p). The present-day number 9 was owned by Mary Dayrell (0a 0r 7p). John Phipps bought number 9 in 1867. On his death, he willed it to his daughter, Mary Ann Sheppard: "and also all those my two cottages and gardens with the appurtenances thereto belonging situate in the parish of Badsey aforesaid formerly occupied by John Nightingale and Mary Jelfs but now of the said John Nightingale and Oliver Jelfs." At some stage in the 19th century it had been divided to make two dwellings.


9 Orchard Way

East Side – 11 (Badsey Map G041)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to William Smith. It was a house and homestead and amounted to 1a 0r 24p. The house was owned by John Phipps from about the 1870s until his death when it passed to his grandson, Owen Haines. For most of the 20th century it was known as Vine Lodge, but it has been known as Meadway House since 2004. The land at the rear has been sold off over the years.

East Side – 11A; Poplar Court 8, 9, 10, 11 (Badsey Map G042)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Thomas Payne. It was called Payne’s cottages, consisting of two cottages and gardens and amounted to 0a 0r 19p. They were sold in 1842 by Stephen White, the son-in-law of Thomas Payne, to Joseph Knight. Joseph Knight in turn sold the cottages to siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd who lived across the road at The Poplars. At some stage in the latter part of the 19th century, two more cottages were built at the eastern end and the present-day number 11A (Gladstone Cottage) was erected fronting on to the road. The 1883 Ordnance Survey map clearly shows Gladstone Cottage abutting the road with four cottages at right-angles behind, the far two slightly longer than the other two. At the far end there was a building which was used in the 19th century as a Reading Room and in the 20th century as an electrical store. In the early 20th century, the land was bought by Horace Wheatley and remained in the Wheatley family until the latter part of the 20th century. The cottages were known as The Alley (although the 1924 Electoral Roll lists them as Cider Mill Court) and were demolished in the latter half of the 20th century. Poplar Court, a development of 16 terraced houses, which has a postal address of High Street but is not part of the High Street numbering system, was built in the 1970s. These four houses, on the northern part of the plot appear to be on the site of the privies and pig-stys of The Alley cottages.

East Side – Poplar Court 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17 (Badsey Map G043)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Thomas Byrd. It was three cottages and gardens and amounted to 0a 1r 7p. At some stage during the 19th century, it appears that Thomas Byrd knocked down the cottages, built a cider mill, and then built more workers’ cottages slightly to the north. In the early 20th century, the land was bought by Horace Wheatley and remained in the Wheatley family until the latter part of the 20th century. Ted Wheatley established a garage (Poplars Garage, named after the house of that name on the opposite side of the road) on the site in the 1950s which remained until the 1970s. In the 1970s, the garage was demolished and Poplar Court, a development of 16 terraced houses, was built on the site. Poplar Court has a postal address of High Street but is not part of the High Street numbering system. The numbers are 1-17 with no number 13.

See article Cider Mill & The Alley.

East Side – 17, 19 (Badsey Map G044)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Thomas Byrd. It was called Stable and Dovecote Close and amounted to 2a 1r 12p. At some stage in the early part of the 20th century, the land was bought by Horace Wheatley and remained in the Wheatley family until the latter part of the 20th century; it was known as Wheatleys’ Orchard. A bungalow was built on the land in the 1950s, at the same time as the garage. Like the garage, it was demolished in the 1970s and a pair of semi-detached bungalows was built.

East Side – 21 (Badsey Map G045)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Jones. It was called Langet and amounted to 0a 2r 27p. Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). Until 1870, tThe current front garden of this house was occupied by a pool which extended the whole width of the front garden and as far as the current front garden of number 23. The pool was used as a watering-point for passing livestock but, in July 1870, a parish meeting unanimously resolved "… that the pool in the middle of Badsey village be closed up and the road altered, in place of which Mr William Byrd undertakes to make a well and put up a good pump and cattle trough to be constantly supplied with water at his own expense". William Byrd got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; an Abstract of Title dated 1890 shows that William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings, and began to sell off the land. This field now comprised a field of 0a 3r 23p called Langet Orchard and was used as pasture. It was bought, along with Seward House opposite, in 1890 by William Baldwyn of Ashton under Hill and was known as Large Orchard. After his death in 1898, it passed by inheritance to his co-heiresses, Frances Baldwyn Smith and Ann Heavens Bamber, who then sold the house and orchard to Julius Sladden for £1,430. In May 1951, two of Sir Julius Sladden’s daughters, May and Ethel Sladden, sold the orchard to Francis Edward Jones. He built a house on the most westerly section abutting the High Street. There was a restrictive covenant which stated that, for the benefit of Seward House occupants, nothing could be built on the land immediately next to the High Street for the next 21 years and that it should be cultivated as a garden and shrubbery. In 1954, Francis Jones sold the most easterly section of the land, comprising 1,071 square yards, to Frederick Joseph Barnard. Francis Jones died in 1956 and, in 1961, a further 4,956 square yards was sold by his executors to Frederick Barnard, being the land immediately behind the property.

East Side – 23, 25, 25A (Badsey Map G048)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Piercy Jones. It was a house and garden, the present-day Pool House (number 23) and Dower House (number 25), and amounted to 0a 0r 24p. It was bought by Thomas Byrd in 1858 when it was sold by the beneficiaries of the will of Piercy Jones who had died in 1837. It is possible that he was responsible for the planting of the Wellingtonia tree which dominated the Badsey landscape for 130 years. It remained in the Byrd family until 1925. The property was divided into two houses (23 & 25) in 1950. Number 25A was built in the grounds of number 25 in 2005.


High Street & the Wellingtonia tree

See article Wellingtonia tree.

East Side – Church of St James (Badsey Map G050 & G051)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, the plot of land on which the church is situated was an old enclosure which belonged to Edward Wilson. The churchyard comprised one acre and there was an additional part of the churchyard garden amounting to 10 perches on which a cottage owned by the Oldaker family was situated. The churchyard at Badsey thus did not belong to the rector or incumbent; it was held by the Lord of the Manor who claimed the chancel and divided burial fees with the incumbent. There were complaints in 1855 that Wilson’s lessee neglected the churchyard and put sheep on it, but he had agreed to give up his lease for £2 10s a year, and it was agreed to divert the footpath. On 23rd July 1866, Edward Wilson sold the churchyard (along with other land) at an auction at The Northwick Arms Hotel, Evesham, in Lot 1. The Reverend Thomas Hunt contracted to buy the churchyard for £185. Some 24 years later, Hunt’s successor, the Reverend Charles Gepp was confused as to the exact state of affairs and wrote to the Dean of Christ Church asking for the right to Badsey churchyard to be clarified, as it had been conveyed to Hunt, who was now non-resident, and Joseph Jones, who was then churchwarden; Hunt had, in fact, bought the churchyard on behalf of Christ Church.


St James Church

East Side – 27 (Badsey Map G054)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to William Collett. It was a house and orchard, the present-day The Firs, and amounted to 1a 0r 5p. It passed out of the Colletts’ hands in 1865 following the death of Mary Collett when it was sold at public auction. The Firs was bought by Victor Cockerton in 1920. His grandson still lives in the house to this day.

East Side – The Wheatsheaf (Badsey Map G055)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to John Gibbs (whom it is believed bought it in 1780 from Robert Mason). It was a house and homestead (known since the late 19th century as The Wheatsheaf), and amounted to 1a 1r 38p. It remained in the Gibbs family ownership until the mid 19th century.


Wheatsheaf Inn about 1910

Wheatsheaf Inn
The Wheatsheaf in the 1920s

East Side – 31, The Vicarage (Badsey Map G056)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to the Reverend Thomas Williams. The site consisted of barns, yards and rickyards and amounted to 0a 0r 34p. Thomas Williams died in 1829 and the land passed by inheritance to the Allies family, remaining in their ownership until 1864 when they sold it to Joseph Woodward, the agent of the estate. Woodward in turn sold the Badsey part of the estate (lot 1) to John Pickup Lord, who died in 1877, but whose executors administered the estate for some time. The bulk of this plot of land (the southerly part upon which the Vicarage is built) was sold to Christ Church in 1898. The most northern part, on which the barns were situated, was sold to Arthur Jones, who had also bought the land on the opposite side of the High Street. The barns were demolished in about 1967 and number 31 (semi-detached with 2 School Lane) was built in the 1970s.


View Larger Map

West Side – The Royal British Legion (Aldington Map Z007)

Whilst this building would more logically have an address of Synehurst Crescent, the correct postal address is High Street. In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by George Day. It amounted to 11a 3r 25p and comprised part of the land belonging to Aldington Farm, which had previously been owned by the Foley family for nearly 140 years. Thomas Foley of Witley had bought "all that Manor of Aldington alias Aunton, and all that farm called Aunton Farm now in the tenure of William Jarrett, gentleman" in 1665. This piece of land, together with the neighbouring field to the west, was known as Seaneys Ground, comprising 18a 3r 28p in total, and was sold by another Thomas Lord Foley in 1803 to John Procter for £760. Just over two years later, in February 1806, John Procter, sold the two fields to George Day (who had bought the remaining part of the Aldington Farm estate from the Foleys in 1805) for £1,365. On 6th October 1808, just two days after the Enclosure Awards, George Day sold the entire Aldington estate to James Ashwin of Bretforton, for £12,000. In 1815, a new main road to Evesham was built, cutting through the field. In the 1840s, Richard Ashwin, who lived at Aldington Manor donated a small piece of land (80 feet x 42 feet) for the purpose of building a school. A National School was erected on the site in 1854. A new school was opened on School Lane in 1895 and the old school was used for community purposes. In 1951, it was bought from the Diocesan Board by George Henry Stewart for use by the Boy Scouts. In 1962, it was sold to the British Legion (now the Royal British Legion).

West Side – 4, 6 (Badsey Map G029)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Edward Wilson. It was described as a house and homestead, being Badsey Manor House, and amounted to 0a 3r 11p. It had been owned by the Wilson family since the mid 17th century. On 23rd July 1866, Edward Wilson (1820-1907), the son of Edward, tried to sell the property at an auction at The Northwick Arms Hotel, Evesham. It was unsold, so he continued to let it out to tenants until he returned to Badsey to live in the late 1870s. After the death of Edward Wilson, it passed to his sister, but was then sold, thus ending 250 years of continuous ownership by the Wilson family. It was semi-derelict in the period between the two world wars in the 20th century, but in 1947 it was bought and made into two houses by Harry Robinson.

See article Badsey Manor House - The Seyne House.

Manor House
Manor House in the 1920s

West Side – 8, 8A (Badsey Map G027)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Sarah Harrington. It was a house (present-day number 8) and homestead and amounted to 1a 1r 21p. Edward Appelbee acquired the house in the 1820s. Harrington House was sold by the trustees of the will of Thomas Appelbee and his sister, Mrs William Gibbs (Edward Appelbee’s children), at a sale at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham, on 6th July 1891. It was bought by Arthur Jones, who then sold it to Edward Johns in 1921 (the Johns family had been tenants since 1887). It remained in the Johns family until 1965 when it was sold to Ernest Mustoe, Henry King and Harry Robinson, who intended to develop the site. The western part of the land was sold in 1968 to Branden Housing Industries Ltd and this led to the building of houses on Seward Road. Harrington House stood derelict for six years until it was sold and restored in 1971. A further piece of land to the west of the house was sold to Greville Properties Ltd (later known as Cavendish Holdings Ltd) in 1973. A house was built on the land, The Willows (number 8A), which was sold in 1975.

See article Harrington House.

West Side – 8B, 10, 10A, 12 (Badsey Map G026)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to William Wilson. It was a house (present-day number 10) and homestead and amounted to 1a 2r 37p. William Wilson died in 1818 and it passed by inheritance to his son, William George Wilson. In 1842, William Junior sold this and all his other land (76 acres in total) to James Ashwin of Bretforton for £3290 10s 0d. Shortly after this, Edward Appelbee, who lived at neighbouring Harrington House, bought the house and adjacent blacksmiths. Hollywood Villa, as it was later known, was sold as part of the Harrington House estate by the trustees of the will of Thomas Appelbee and his sister, Mrs William Gibbs (Edward Appelbee’s children), at a sale at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham, on 6th July 1891. It was bought by Arthur Jones, who then sold it to Edward Johns in 1921 (the Johns family had been tenants since 1887). In 1965, the Johns family sold the bulk of the land to Ernest Mustoe, Henry King and Harry Robinson, but retained Hollywood Villa and the building which had formerly housed the blacksmith. The most westerly part of the land was sold in 1968 to Branden Housing Industries Ltd and this led to the building of houses on Seward Road. A further piece of land immediately behind Hollywood Villa was sold to Greville Properties Ltd (later known as Cavendish Holdings Ltd) in 1973. A house was built on the land, number 8B, which was sold in 1974. Hollywood Villa was occupied for many years (c 1933-1997) by the Hartwell family as tenants. In the 1980s, the former blacksmith’s was converted into residential accommodation. Hollywood Villa was sold in 1997, knocked down and rebuilt.

See article Hollywood Villa.

West Side – The Spar, 18, 18A (Badsey Map G025)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Simpson. It was a house and homestead (present-day number 18) and amounted to 1a 1r 13p. In the 1840s, siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd, who owned the land to the south, bought "the messuage or tenement, buildings, garden, orchard and premises." It was probably soon after this that the house was refurbished, as a date of 1858 can be seen on the south wall. The Byrds may also have been responsible for the erection of the building which now houses the Spar. Most of the land was sold to John Cull who moved to Badsey in about 1883 to set up a baker’s business (known throughout most of the 20th century as The Sumachs Bakery). According to a plan of 1921 relating to the neighbouring Harrington House and Hollywood Villa, it would appear that the building which today houses The Spar still belonged to Thomas Byrd, and that the rest of the land belonged to John E Cull. The western part of the land was sold off in the 1960s for housing development on Seward Road but numbers 18 and 18A are still owned today by a descendant of the Cull family.

West Side – 20, 20A (Badsey Map G024)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Thomas Byrd. It was two cottages and gardens (demolished in about the 1860s) and amounted to 0a 0r 30p. The land was not built on again until the 1960s when a pair of semi-detached houses was built.

West Side – 22, 22A (Badsey Map G023)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Thomas Byrd. It was a house and homestead (The Poplars, demolished in the 1960s) and amounted to 1a 3r 12p. It was bought by Horace Wheatley in the early 20th century and remained in the Wheatley family until the 1960s when the land was sold for development. The extensive grounds provided the access road for the new housing estates of The Poplars and Seward Road, whilst a pair of semi-detached houses was built on the site of the old house.


The house called 'The Poplars'

West Side – 24 (now converted into 24A and 24B), 24A, 24B, 24C, 24D (Badsey Map G020)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Jones. It was described as Burrows’ house and homestead and amounted to 1a 2r 18p. It was known as Burrows’ House because, until about 1800, it had been owned by Thomas and Susannah Burrows (née Seward), Susannah’s family having owned the house for a hundred years previously; but throughout most of the 19th century and through to the present day, the house has been known as Seward House. Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, Mary and William Byrd who lived at the neighbouring house, The Poplars. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). William Byrd got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; an Abstract of Title dated 1890 shows that William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings, and began to sell off the land, including this orchard. The house, garden and outbuildings amounted to 0a 2r 24p and the foldyards and buildings amounted to 0a 2r 12p. The house and the orchard opposite were bought in 1890 by William Baldwyn of Ashton under Hill. After his death in 1898, it passed by inheritance to his co-heiresses, Frances Baldwyn Smith and Ann Heavens Bamber, who then sold the house and orchard to Julius Sladden (who had been the tenant since 1879) for £1,430.In 1907, the house passed out of Byrd ownership, being bought by the tenant, Julius Sladden. The Sladdens owned the house until 1985 when it was converted into a nursing home. The nursing home closed in 2002 and the house was converted into two residential properties and the outbuildings converted into two cottages; the new owners moved in early 2004.


Seward House & The Poplars

Seward House
Seward House in the 1920s

West Side – 26 (Badsey Map G019)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to John Jones. It was a house and homestead and amounted to 1a 0r 6p. After John Jones’ death, the house was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. The house and land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). William Byrd got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; an Abstract of Title dated 1890 shows that William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings, and began to sell off the land and property. The house was named The Laurels early in the 20th century.

West Side – 28 (Badsey Map G018)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Jones. It was a house and homestead and amounted to 1a 0r 20p. Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. By the mid 19th century, several families seemed to live in the building, and a part of it was used for a Wesleyan chapel. According to documents at Christ Church, it was empty for some years and was bought in 1869 and knocked down. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). William Byrd got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; an Abstract of Title dated 1890 shows that William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings, and began to sell off the land. A house was built on the land in 1897 when Elijah and Rose Crisp made it their family home and opened a Post Office.


Post Office

West Side – 30, 32 (Badsey Map G017)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Jones. It was a cottage and garden and amounted to 0a 0r 10p. Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was probably bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd, and is believed to have been knocked down in 1869, along with the adjoining building. New houses were built on the land at the beginning of the 20th century.

West Side – 34 (Badsey Map G016)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to William Bingley. It was a cottage and garden and amounted to 0a 0r 19p. By 1899 it was in the ownership of Lizzie Heritage. She sold it, together with two other pieces of land that she owned in the village, to William Mustoe in 1901. It remained in the Mustoe family until William’s daughter’s death (Patsy Morris) in 1960.

West Side – 36 (Badsey Map G015)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Jones. It was a house and homestead and amounted to 1a 3r 27p. Joseph Jones sold most of his land and houses in Badsey in 1831, but retained this property. The Jones family had financial difficulties and, in 1868, Joseph’s widow and children were forced to sell the house because of defaulting on the mortgage. It was bought by William Byrd, whose family owned some of the large houses along the High Street. William Byrd himself got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; an Abstract of Title dated 1890 shows that William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings, and began to sell off the land. The house (by now known as Malvern House) was put up for sale at public auction on 30th June 1890 and was bought by William Baldwyn of Ashton-under-Hill, who also purchased Seward House. After his death in 1898, it passed by inheritance to his co-heiresses, Frances Baldwyn Smith and Ann Heavens Bamber, who then sold the house to Arthur Edward Jones in 1901 for £656. Arthur was the grandson of Joseph Jones who had owned the house at the time of Enclosure and so the family home was recovered. In 1977, 1.26 acres of land at the back was sold to SquareDeal Homes Ltd, which paved the way for the building of more houses on Seward Road. Malvern House remained in the Jones family until 1996 when Arthur’s daughter-in-law, Bertha, died.

High Street
Montpellier and Malvern House in the 1920s

West Side – 38 (Badsey Map G013)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to John Procter. It comprised two cottages and gardens occupied by Charles Hartall and John Burton and amounted to 0a 0r 25p. John Procter then exchanged these with the Reverend Thomas Williams: "And the said Commissioners assign, allot and award in Exchange to the said Thomas Williams and his Heirs, All those three Cottages and Gardens called Nap Close and Nap Orchard containing three acres two roods and eleven perches in lieu of and in Exchange for the said sixth Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Williams and his Heirs" (the third cottage was in the neighbouring plot of land). The right of way which exists across part of this plot today did not exist in 1812 but was in existence by the time of the Ordnance Survey map of 1883. Thomas Williams died in 1829 and the land passed by inheritance to the Allies family, remaining in their ownership until 1864 when they sold it to Joseph Woodward, the agent of the estate. Woodward in turn sold the Badsey part of the estate (lot 1) in 1866 to John Pickup Lord; he died in 1877, but his executors administered the estate for some time. The cottages were bought by Arthur Jones in 1911. They were knocked down in the mid 20th century and the site was incorporated into the garden of the neighbouring Malvern House. In 1978, Mrs Bertha Jones of Malvern House sold the plot and The Rock was built.

West Side – 40 (Badsey Map G012 and part Road)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, the land on which this house is situated was mainly in the village street, but the back garden is situated in what was an old enclosure belonging to John Procter. It was Gould’s cottage and garden and amounted to 0a 0r 14p. John Procter then exchanged with the Reverend Thomas Williams: "And the said Commissioners assign, allot and award in Exchange to the said Thomas Williams and his Heirs, All those three Cottages and Gardens called Nap Close and Nap Orchard containing three acres two roods and eleven perches in lieu of and in Exchange for the said sixth Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Williams and his Heirs" (the other two cottages were in the neighbouring plot of land). Thomas Williams died in 1829 and the land passed by inheritance to the Allies family, remaining in their ownership until 1864 when they sold it to Joseph Woodward, the agent of the estate. Woodward in turn sold the Badsey part of the estate (lot 1) in 1866 to John Pickup Lord; he died in 1877, but his executors administered the estate for some time. The map and sales particulars show that the cottage had been knocked down by 1866. Montpellier was built on the land in 1913.


Montpellier, E F Salter's shop

West Side – 42, 44, 44A (Badsey Map G010)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to the Reverend Thomas Williams. It was a house (present-day number 42) and homestead and amounted to 0a 1r 21p. Thomas Williams died in 1829 and the land passed by inheritance to the Allies family, remaining in their ownership until 1864 when they sold it to Joseph Woodward, the agent of the estate. Woodward in turn sold the Badsey part of the estate (lot 1) in 1866 to John Pickup Lord; he died in 1877, but his executors administered the estate for some time. It was bought by Arthur Jones in 1911 and was known during much of the 20th century as The Stone House, but is now called Badsey Hall. Fairview (number 44) was built in the grounds in 1913 and Lane Ends in the 1990s.


Fairview in the early twentieth century

West Side – 46, 48, 50 (Badsey Map G008)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Thomas Knight. It was a house (the present-day numbers 46 & 48) and garden and amounted to 0a 0r 35p. By the mid 19th century, a third cottage had been added on. The three cottages, together with the adjoining Field Cottage in Mill Lane, which had been built at the rear, were often referred to as Mill Cottages. At some stage during the 19th century, they were bought either by the Reverend Thomas Williams or by Joseph Woodward. They were in Joseph Woodward's ownership when he sold them at auction (lot 8) in 1866. They were bought by John Pickup Lord; he died in 1877, but his executors administered the estate for some time. By the early 20th century, they were in the ownership of Richard Pendlebury and passed by inheritance to his daughter, Maud Newbury. Maud Newbury kept the cottages until the 1950s when she sold them to individual owners.

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 25 September 2014. Email History@badsey.net.