Enclosure map project

Chapel Street, Badsey

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.
enclosure map

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photo: a7070

CHAPEL STREET

In 1815, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure, the road was described as follows: "One private Carriage Road and Drift Way of the breadth of thirty-five feet marked Number 8 on the said plan commencing at the Village of Badsey, extending in an Eastwardly and Southwardly direction until it communicates with the Wickhamford Road at the East end of Gibbs Lane." (The first section refers to the start of the present-day Brewers Lane.) At the point where the road becomes adjacent with the church, it split into two, with parish cottages and land forming an island in the middle. The road then converged again opposite the junction with the present-day Badsey Fields Lane. A pool existed on the east side of the road (known variously as Sand Pool or Green Pool), just south of the entrance to Badsey Fields Lane. The pool was still in existence in 1883 but had gone by 1923.

The road is named after the Quaker chapel which was built on the east side in 1894. Benjamin Cox in his booklet, "Chapels and Meeting Houses in the Vale of Evesham" (published by the Vale of Evesham Historical Society, 1982) said that the road was named Chapel Street long before the building of the present structure, therefore suggesting an earlier building, but there is no evidence to support this (Cox is probably getting confused with the Methodist chapel which used to exist on the other side of the church, in High Street, and which was demolished in the 1860s). In the 1891 census, the address for the cottages which are on the western side north of the church, was given as Green Road. It would have been called Green Road because the land on the eastern side had been an area of common land known as Badsey Green. The 1881 census gives the address for Rose and Vine Cottages as being Sand Pool and the 1891 census gives it as Green Pool (because of their proximity to the pool). The name Chapel Street was certainly in use by 1918 when Douglas Jelfs’ address was given as Chapel Street in the school register.

At the time of Enclosure, there existed several cottages on the west side of the street and parish cottages on an island in the middle of the road. In the mid 19th century, two old cottages were moved from Evesham and erected on the south side of the island on land which had hitherto been part of the road. Development started along the east side in the 1890s. When the numbering was done, it seems that a space was left for a number 12. In the event, four houses were built set slightly back from Chapel Street and were called 1-4 Church End.


Badsey Mission Room

East Side – 1, 3, 5, 7, C & G Dance Club, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23 (Badsey Map W006)

In 1815, when the enclosure commissioners made their award, Joseph Jones was allotted this piece of land: "Unto Joseph Jones and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All those four several Allotments next herein after awarded, that is to say, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate on Badsey Green containing one acre three roods and fifteen perches, bounded on part of the East and North sides by the second Allotment herein awarded to Edward Wilson, on the remainder of the East by an old Inclosure belonging to Sarah Wilson and on the South-West and remainder of the North sides by private Carriage Roads." Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). William Byrd got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; an Abstract of Title dated 1890 shows that William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings, and began to sell off the land. This field, now combined with the neighbouring plot to the east, was called Ox Close and comprised 6a 0r 11p of pasture. Part of the land was sold in 1890 and several houses and a chapel were built by 1894. James Brewer bought the land on the corner with Brewers Lane, built a bakery (situated on Brewers Lane) and a house attached for his family (number 1).


Hutchings family of 15 Chapel Street

East Side – 25, 27, 29 (Badsey Map W005 and G061)

The western part of these houses and gardens are on land which in 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, was allotted to John Jones as his first allotment: "Unto John Jones and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All those three several Allotments next herein after awarded, that is to say, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate on Powells Green containing two roods and thirty-four perches, bounded on the East by an Allotment herein awarded to Joseph Jones, on the South and remaining part of the East by old Inclosures belonging to the said John Jones, on the West and North by the Wickhamford Road and the private carriage Roads marked Numbers 8 and 10." The eastern part of these houses and back gardens are on land which John Jones already owned. It was called Sand Close and amounted to 4a 0r 18p in total. After John Jones’ death in 1850, the land remained in the Jones family but was mortgaged to Henry Burlingham for £2000. Joseph Jones (John’s nephew) defaulted on the mortgage and so the land was sold at auction on 7th July 1888. (See 1888 indenture map.) The land, known as Sands Garden, which had been used as garden ground, was divided into five lots of around an acre each. Within a decade, Ivy House (number 25) had been built on the land.


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West Side – 2 (Badsey Map G046)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Thomas Holyoak. It was a cottage and garden and amounted to 0a 0r 16p. It remained in the Holyoak family until at least the 1880s.

West Side – 4 (Badsey Map G047) and Blacksmith’s (Badsey Map G046)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to William Bishop. It was a cottage and garden and amounted to 0a 1r 31p. At some time during the 19th century, an old outbuilding which had been part of the neighbouring property belonging to Holyoak was extended to back on to the existing cottage. It remained in the Bishop family until at least the 1870s. The outbuilding became a blacksmith’s shop when Frank Caswell moved from Bretforton in 1908.


The blacksmith’s shop, 1927


Shoeing a horse, 2002

West Side – 6 (Badsey Map G049)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Piercy Jones and amounted to 0a 1r 5p. It was adjacent to Pool House, High Street, also owned by Piercy Jones. It was bought by Thomas Byrd in 1858 when it was sold by the beneficiaries of the will of Piercy Jones who had died in 1837. Pool House, including this land, was sold by the Byrd family in 1925. A bungalow, Byeways (number 6) was built on the land in the early 1950s when part of the garden of Pool House was sold by the owners.


Blacksmith's cottage about 1913

West Side – Churchyard and Lychgate (Badsey Map G052 and G051)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, one plot of land (G052) was an old enclosure which belonged to Samuel Oldaker. It comprised a cottage and garden and amounted to 0a 0r 6p. Behind it was a small garden comprising 10 perches (actually part of the churchyard) which the Oldakers rented from Edward Wilson. Certainly, when Edward Wilson came to sell most of his land in 1866, Lot 1 was described as being "the churchyard of the said parish of Badsey, and the Garden adjoining thereto, now occupied by Mrs E Oldaker". Part of the Oldaker cottage was used as a blacksmith’s shop until the 1870s. The cottage was pulled down in 1949 when the Parochial Church Council wished to extend the churchyard. A lychgate was erected in 1950 in memory of Arthur Sears.

West Side – Garden of Remembrance (Badsey Map G053)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Badsey and Aldington Poor. It consisted of parish cottages and amounted to 0a 0r 30p. The Enclosure Map shows that the cottages were situated on an island in the middle of the road; a parish pound was also situated on the island. The schedule is difficult to read. It would appear to say there were six cottages but, certainly by 1837 when they were sold (as a result of the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834), there were only four. Joseph Knight bought the cottages and, on his death in 1843 left them to his three youngest children, Charles, Harriet and William (his eldest son, Robert, inheriting his principal residence). Harriet, married to Thomas Sharp, bought her brothers’ shares in the cottages, and she and her husband built four new cottages in 1844 at right-angles to the old cottages. It may have been at this stage that two old houses (numbers 8 and 10) were moved from Evesham to Badsey and erected to the south of the new cottages. Three of the old cottages were knocked down in the 1870s. By 1891 (and probably earlier), they were being referred to as Sharps Row. Harriet Sharp died in 1899 and her son sold the cottages to John Idiens & Sons Ltd. John Idiens defaulted on the mortgage and in 1909, the Refuge Assurance Co Ltd sold the cottages to Julius Sladden. The cottages remained in the Sladden family until 1949 when they were sold to the Parochial Church Council to extend the churchyard. This particular part of the churchyard extension was set aside as a Garden of Remembrance. In 1966 it was dedicated as a memorial to Charles Binyon. As part of a Millennium project, the Women’s Institute refurbished the Garden of Remembrance in 2000.

West Side – 8, 10, Demolished houses Sharps Row (Badsey Map R8)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, the houses on this plot of land were part of Road number 8: "One private Carriage Road and Drift Way of the breadth of thirty-five feet marked Number 8 on the said plan commencing at the Village of Badsey, extending in an Eastwardly and Southwardly direction until it communicates with the Wickhamford Road at the East end of Gibbs Lane." In the 1840s, two old cottages were moved from Evesham and reconstructed in Badsey, being the present-day numbers 8 and 10, and which backed on to the newly-built cottages of 1844. In 1932, Emma Wilson (fourth wife of the last Lord of the Manor) owned number 8 at her death, and number 10 was owned by Frank Amos and Margaret McDonald. Both were sold in 1932 to Ethel Sladden who, on her death in 1961, left Vine Cottage as a legacy to the church; her sister, Juliet Sladden, then offered the attached Rose Cottage for the benefit of the church. In 1982, the Parochial Church Council sold both cottages to private owners.

West Side – 14, 16, 18, 20 (Badsey Map G055)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to John Gibbs (whom it is believed bought the land in 1780 from Robert Mason). It was part of the garden belonging to his house and homestead (The Wheatsheaf, High Street), and amounted to 1a 1r 38p. The land remained in the Gibbs family ownership until the mid 19th century.


Chapel Street 1905

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 7 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.