Enclosure map project

Bowers Hill, Badsey

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.
enclosure map

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photos: a7100

BOWERS HILL

Bowers Hill is an area in the south-east of the parish, forming an extension of Willersey Road on its east side. A farm grew up here in the post-enclosure period. There was then no more development until the 20th century when ten workers’ houses (five pairs of semi-detached houses) were erected. In the latter part of the 20th century, Bowers Hill Nurseries was started; two detached houses and a detached bungalow were also built. In 2006, some of the farm buildings at Bowers Hill Farm have been converted for residential use.

At the time of the Enclosure, it was called the Willersey Road and was described as follows: "One other Public Carriage Road and Highway of the breadth of forty feet marked Number 4 on the said map commencing from the termination of the last described Road and leading in a Southward direction to Frances Grave from thence in an Eastwardly direction on the North side of Laid Hedge to Pear Tree Close belonging to Thomas Byrd and from thence in a Southwardly and Eastwardly direction until it enters the Parish of Willersey on the East side of Common called Dry Leys." The section which relates to Bowers Hill is the last part when it turns in an easterly direction after leaving Pear Tree Close.

Bowers Hill Farm House, Bowers Hill Farm Cottage, Barn Conversions (Badsey Map G127)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to the Reverend Thomas Williams. It was called Pear Tree Close and amounted to 3a 0r 18p. Reverend Williams then exchanged with John Slatter: "And the said Commissioners assign, allot and award in Exchange unto the said John Slatter and his Heirs, All that piece or Inclosed Ground called Pear Tree Close containing three acres and eighteen perches in lieu of and in Exchange for the said fifth Allotment herein awarded in Exchange to the said Thomas Williams and his Heirs." A farmhouse was built on the land in the decade or two following enclosure. At some stage, John Slatter sold the land to William Collett, but whether Slatter or Collett created the farm is not known. William Collett died in 1850 and his widow, Mary Collett, being childless, left Bowers Hill Farm to her nephews, Thomas Yardington Tovey and William Tovey in 1865. In 1895, Henry Panting Byrd and siblings bought Bowers Hill Farm from the mortgagees of the Toveys. In 1905, it was sold to John Idiens, but he became bankrupt. The farm was then bought by Johnson Thornely in 1924; it has remained in the same family since that date. The cottage has been refurbished in 2006 and farm buildings converted into four houses in a courtyard setting.

Paddock (Badsey Map G130, G131, G132)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this consisted of three strips of land which were old enclosures being part of pasture land called Condercup Meadow. Edward Savage owned two of the strips (2a 0r 12p and 1a 0r 22p) whilst John Procter owned the middle strip (1a 0r 7p). John Slatter, who had been allotted all the surrounding land, exchanged land to acquire this area: "And the said Commissioners assign, allot and award in Exchange to the said John Slatter and his Heirs, All those pieces or parcels of Inclosed Land or Ground containing three acres and thirty-four perches being part or parcel of a piece of Land or Ground called Condercup Meadow in lieu of and in Exchange for the said third Allotment herein awarded to the said John Slatter and his Heirs" and also"And the said Commissioners assign, allot and award in Exchange to the said John Slatter and his Heirs, All that piece or parcel of the said old Inclosed Ground called Condercup Meadow containing one acre and seven perches in lieu of and in Exchange for the said fourth Allotment herein awarded to the said John Slatter and his Heirs." By the early 20th century, this area was known as Second Paddock Meadow.


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Bowers Hill Nurseries, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, Ruperts House (Badsey Map W052)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, John Slatter was made the following second allotment: "Also all that other Allotment of Land situate in Bully Brook Field and Foxhill Field containing fifty-three acres two roods and nineteen perches, bounded by the Parish of Broadway, the fifth Allotment herein awarded to the said Mary Harrington and others herein awarded in Exchange to the said John Slatter, the Willersey Road, old Inclosures called Condercope Meadows and Condercope Grounds and Peartree Close and Allotments herein awarded to the said Curate, the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessees the said John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter." The field was called Dry Leys at the time of Enclosure, but early 20th century maps give the name as Barley Leys. John Idiens, who bought the farm in 1905, intended to build 14 houses on this field and the adjoining field to the east. In 1911, he entered into a contract with the General Land Drainage Company to provide water for the new houses, but defaulted on the payment and was declared bankrupt. Instead of 14 houses, ten were built: three pairs of semi-detached houses on this plot (numbers 1-6) and two pairs on the adjoining land. When John Idiens’ mortgagees came to sell Bowers Hill Farm in 1924, these houses were not part of the sale. Ruperts House was built to the east in the 1970s.

North Side – Colts Run, Paw Prints, 7, 8, 9, 10 (Badsey Map W053)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, Mary, Elizabeth and Sarah Harrington were made the following fifth allotment: "Also all that other Allotment situate in Foxhill Field containing twenty-four acres one rood and thirty-four perches, bounded on the East side by the Parish of Bretforton, on the South by the Parish of Willersey, South-West by the Willersey Road and the North-West and North-East by an Allotment herein awarded to the said John Slatter, which said last mentioned Allotment is awarded in Exchange to John Slatter." The Harrington sisters then exchanged the land with John Slatter: "And the said Commissioners hereby assign, allot and award in Exchange unto John Slatter and his Heirs, All that the aforesaid Allotment containing twenty-four acres one rood and thirty-four perches being the fifth Allotment herein awarded to the said Mary Harrington, Elizabeth Harrington and Sarah Harrington bounded as herein before described in lieu of and in Exchange for, All those three old Inclosures, pieces or parcels of Land herein after described. And the said Commissioners order and direct that the Mounds and Fences next to the said Willersey Road shall be made and at all times for ever kept in repair by and at the expense of the said John Slatter and the owners and occupiers of the said Allotment for the time being." The field was called Dry Leys at the time of Enclosure, but early 20th century maps give the name as Barley Leys. John Idiens, who bought the farm in 1905, intended to build 14 houses on this field and the adjoining field to the west. In 1911, he entered into a contract with the General Land Drainage Company to provide water for the new houses, but defaulted on the payment and was declared bankrupt. Instead of 14 houses, ten were built: two pairs of semi-detached houses on this plot (numbers 7-10) and three pairs on the adjoining land. When John Idiens’ mortgagees came to sell Bowers Hill Farm in 1924, these houses were not part of the sale, except for number 10. Colts Run and Paw Prints were built to the west in the 1960s.

See also the 'Bowers Hill' chapter in Aldington and Badsey: Villages in the Vale.

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 7 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.