Enclosure map project

Birmingham Road, Blackminster (B4085)

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.
enclosure map

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photos: a6929 a7172 a7199

BIRMINGHAM ROAD

See also Birmingham Road, Badsey.

This road is variously called Birmingham Road or simply Blackminster; the Royal Mail database is rather confusing concerning the matter. All the houses on the west side, plus the houses on the east side just south of the railway, have a postal address of Blackminster, Evesham. Indeed, a road sign called Blackminster is at the start of the line of bungalows; and yet Havard & Co, on the east side, with its own postcode, has a postal address of Birmingham Road, Blackminster. C B G Transport and Hillfox Produce Ltd, just to the north of the footpath and line of bungalows on the west side, have the same postcode as houses further to the south on the east side; their address is Birmingham Road, Badsey.

The road was originally known as Blackminster Lane. The name Birmingham Road was not given until about 1960. Since the end of the 19th century, it had been an important route for sending market gardening produce to market in Birmingham. In 1884 Littleton and Badsey Station (situated in the parish of Offenham) opened and so it became an even more important transit route. The station was closed on 3rd January 1966, but the road is still a busy thoroughfare with many HGV lorries transporting goods to out-of-town warehouses.

There is evidence that the land in this area was occupied in Roman times. Arthur Savory, author of "Grain and Chaff from an English Manor", wrote about the Roman settlement.

East Side – Land on bend (Offenham Map 184 and 185)

In the latter part of the 18th century, this land belonged to Francis Jones of Badsey. By his will of 1795, he gave all his estate at Blackminster to his nephew, Piercy Jones. Piercy Jones died in 1837 and, by his will, he granted life interests in his land at Offenham and Badsey to Esther and Alice Laugher (the younger spinster sisters of his brother Joseph’s first wife Elizabeth who had died in 1826). In 1841, at the time of the Offenham Tithe Map, Miss Esther Laugher was recorded as both owner and tenant. It was described as an orchard and the value was £0 4s 11d. In the north-eastern corner of the plot of land, there was also a small coppice owned by Esther Laugher. Esther Laugher died in 1858, some 12 years after her sister, and the nieces and nephews of Piercy Jones (the five surviving children of the third marriage of Joseph Jones) were free to sell the land, which they did in September 1858 to Joseph Woodward, who had been Land Agent for the Reverend Thomas Williams and his descendants who had owned neighbouring land. Joseph Woodward sold the land, along with the land in Aldington which he had bought from Reverend Williams’ descendants, in 1866 to William Henry Ashwin of Bretforton. This piece of land was then known as Blackminster Meadow and amounted to 2a 0r 32p. When the Ashwin family sold their land at Blackminster in 1912, this was not part of the sale, so it must have been sold at an earlier date.

East Side – A McLennan Building Supplies (Offenham Map 187)

In 1841, at the time of the Offenham Tithe Map, this plot of land belonged to Mrs Elizabeth Waller and the tenant was Charles Drury. It was called Long Meadow, was used as pasture, and the value was £0 13s 4d. In 1866, when the neighbouring land to the south and west was sold, the plan shows that this area of land was then in the ownership of George Hunt.

East Side – Rose Cottage, Brook Cottage, Havard & Co Ltd, Ivanhoe, Country Kitchens, The Old Farm House, The Hayloft (Offenham Map 190)

In 1841, at the time of the Offenham Tithe Map, this plot of land belonged to William Ballard, who was also the tenant. It was a meadow and the value was £0 9s 0d. From 1851 onwards, there is evidence of a house (The Old Farm House) on this land, believed to have been built to house the foreman of the nearby stoneworks. By this date, big upheavals were occurring in the landscape as the Oxford, Worcester & Wolverhampton Railway, officially opened in 1854, cut across the land. The land was then owned by George Hunt. It was not until 21st April 1884 that Littleton & Badsey Station was opened. The Ordnance Survey map of 1883 marks Lime-kilns in this area, plus several buildings. The Lime and Stone Works had been started by George Hunt in the 1860s or 1870s. "Littlebury’s Directory" for 1873, lists George Hunt as living at Bridge Street, Evesham, and owner of a Lime and Stone Works at Blackminster. The 1871 census lists people living in the vicinity with the occupation of lime burner. The lime-kilns were disused by the 1920s, presumably having fallen into disuse after George Hunt’s death in 1917. Access to the lime-kilns was via "The Smalls", the local name for the road leading to Bretforton. Children who played there during the 1930s recall a big hole from which the stone had been taken to get the lime; it was steep-sided with just a few hawthorn hedges and very dangerous.. The kilns where they burnt the lime were at the back of Havards building.


Old Council Stores, Blackminster


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West Side – Land north of brook, including wooden shed on site of former barn (Offenham Map 181, 182 183)

This land was owned from at least the 18th century by the Wilson family. In 1806, Francis Wilson of Kempsey, passed all 35 acres of his land at Offenham to his son, Edward (Francis was the second son of Edward Wilson, 1720-1761, Lord of the Manor of Badsey); the tenant was John Ballard. It was described then as "barn, stable, cowshed and fold yard and two pieces of arable land and one piece of meadow ground". In 1841, at the time of the Offenham Tithe Map, Edward Wilson is recorded as the owner and the tenant was Charles Drury. It was called Barn Ground, used as arable, and the value was £3 4s 0d; a barn was situated near the road. William Parker was the tenant in the 1850s. Edward Wilson died in 1860 and, after his wife Sophia’s death in 1861, it passed to Sophia’s niece, Victoria Montague Angle. In 1863, Victoria, by now married to Robert Payne, sold this land, plus other land at Offenham, to Joseph Woodward for £2,430. Joseph Woodward in turn sold it as Lot 3 at an auction at The Northwick Arms Hotel, Evesham, in 1866 to William Henry Ashwin. The land remained in the Ashwin family until 1912 when it was sold at auction as Lots 20, 21 and 22. Barn Ground was bought by William Mustoe and, for much of the first part of the 20th century, it was known as Mustoe’s Barn. During the 1930s it stood empty and children used to go there and play. The barn was pulled down some time after the Second World War.

West Side – Midgley Dene, Cosey Dene, Glendale, Leahome, Greystones, Fern Lodge, Salamis, Janus Cote, Glen Royd, Greyholme, Easton, Shallan, Homemead (Offenham Map 186)

In the latter part of the 18th century, this land belonged to Francis Jones of Badsey. By his will of 1795, he gave all his estate at Blackminster to his nephew, Piercy Jones. Piercy Jones died in 1837 and, by his will, he granted life interests in his land at Offenham and Badsey to Esther and Alice Laugher (the younger spinster sisters of his brother Joseph’s first wife Elizabeth who had died in 1826). In 1841, at the time of the Offenham Tithe Map, Miss Esther Laugher was recorded as both owner and tenant. It was called Corner Ground, used as arable, and the value was £3 12s 2d. Esther Laugher died in 1858, some 12 years after her sister, and the nieces and nephews of Piercy Jones (the five surviving children of the third marriage of Joseph Jones) were free to sell the land, which they did in September 1858 to Joseph Woodward, who was the estate manager for nearby estates owned by the Allies family, formerly in the ownership of the Reverend Thomas Williams. Joseph Woodward sold the land as Lot 4 at an auction at The Northwick Arms Hotel, Evesham, in 1866 to William Henry Ashwin of Bretforton. This piece of land was then known as Shoulder of Mutton and amounted to 6a 3r 10p. It remained in the Ashwin family until 1912 when it was sold at auction at The King’s Head Hotel, Evesham. Bungalows began to be built on the land in the 1930s.

West Side - C B G Transport, Hillfox Produce Ltd, The Squires 1-8 (Offenham Map 188)

In the latter part of the 18th century, this land belonged to Francis Jones of Badsey. By his will of 1795, he gave all his estate at Blackminster to his nephew, Piercy Jones. Piercy Jones died in 1837 and, by his will, he granted life interests in his land at Offenham and Badsey to Esther and Alice Laugher (the younger spinster sisters of his brother Joseph’s first wife Elizabeth who had died in 1826). In 1841, at the time of the Offenham Tithe Map, Miss Esther Laugher was recorded as both owner and tenant. It was called Old Saintsoin Ground, used as arable, and the value was £3 17s 0d. Esther Laugher died in 1858, some 12 years after her sister, and the nieces and nephews of Piercy Jones (the five surviving children of the third marriage of Joseph Jones) were free to sell the land, which they did in September 1858 to Joseph Woodward, who was the estate manager for nearby estates owned by the Allies family, formerly in the ownership of the Reverend Thomas Williams. Joseph Woodward sold the land at auction at The Northwick Arms Hotel, Evesham, in 1866 to William Henry Ashwin of Bretforton. This piece of land was then known as Quar Ground and the adjoining road (from the crossroads south as far as the footpath) was also part of the sale. It remained in the Ashwin family until 1912 when it was sold at auction at The King’s Head Hotel, Evesham. The Squires is a development of eight houses and was built in about the 1980s on the site of municipal sheds.

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 7 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.