Enclosure map project

Badsey Fields Lane, Badsey

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.
enclosure map

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photos: a6997 a7067 a7070

BADSEY FIELDS LANE

At the time that the Badsey Enclosure Map was drawn up, Badsey Fields Lane was a private road which was described as follows: "One other private Carriage Road and Drift Way of the breadth of thirty feet marked Number 10 on the said plan, branching out of the said herein before described Road marked Number 8 and extending in an Eastwardly direction until it communicates with Pitchness Closes belonging to Thomas Byrd for the use of John Gibbs, Joseph Jones, Thomas Byrd and Edward Wilson." At that stage, the road ran from the junction with what is now Chapel Street, as far as what is now 37 Badsey Fields Lane on the north side and 34 Badsey Fields Lane on the south side. It was for the sole use of the four landowners and their workers, to enable them to have access to their land. At the entrance to the road, on the southern corner, a pool (called in later documents Sand Pool or Green Pool) was situated, and was in existence until at least 1883 where it can be seen on the Ordnance Survey map.

By 1831, the road was being referred to as Pitchness Lane as it led to three pieces of land called Pitchness. Some time between 1815 and 1841, Thomas Byrd extended the lane across Pitchness Closes and over the western part of a very large field called Foxhill and built a farm at the end of the lane. By 1861, the farm was being referred to as Badsey Field. By 1901, the whole road was being referred to as Badsey Field Lane. The Ordnance Survey map of 1923 gives the road name as Badsey Field Road, but by 1938 it was known by its present name of Badsey Fields Lane.

Most of the land on both the north and south sides of the road, and including the road, was owned by the Byrd family in the 19th century (the land at the east end having been allotted to Thomas Byrd in 1815 and the land at the west end having been acquired by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd in 1831). The land passed by inheritance to William Byrd (1841-1902) and Henry Byrd (1843-1908), the nephews of Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. By the latter part of the 19th century, it had been divided up into smaller strips and let out to tenant Market Gardeners under the Evesham Custom. William Byrd got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; by the 1890s, William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings and began to sell of the land, much of which was sold in the 1890s. Percy Byrd, the son of Henry, also ran into financial difficulties, and his land was put up for sale in 1912. The auction was in 58 lots, giving tenants the chance to buy their own plots. The total area was 136 acres, but of this, 67 acres were unsold. The existing mortgages were repaid from the proceeds and a further loan of £1800 raised on the part unsold. This land was sold off at various dates by the time the loan was repaid in 1919. This then paved the way for development along the road.

For some decades, the only housing was the farmhouse, buildings and cottages at the end of the lane, because it was a private road. However, development began on the south side in the 1890s when Norfolk House, Sandford Villa, Summerfield Cottage and The Cottage were built, as William Byrd’s land began to be sold off. Development occurred in the 1890s on the north side with the present-day numbers 1 and 3, and continued in the early years of the 20th century as more land came up for sale.

Initially, all the houses had names but, by January 1959, the houses had been given numbers. The houses are numbered 1-41. There is no number 16, 18, 20 or 22 (these were kept free in anticipation of the land by the Recreation Ground being developed) and the numbering on the south side finishes at Number 34. Where infill has occurred, the appropriate number has been appended with A or B (eg 1A, 23A, 23B, 24A, 32A, 32B). The houses in the small cluster of buildings at the far end of Badsey Fields Lane are not numbered.

North Side – 1A, 1, 3, 5 (Badsey Map W006)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, Joseph Jones was made the following first allotment: "Unto Joseph Jones and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All those four several Allotments next herein after awarded, that is to say, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate on Badsey Green containing one acre three roods and fifteen perches, bounded on part of the East and North sides by the second Allotment herein awarded to Edward Wilson, on the remainder of the East by an old Inclosure belonging to Sarah Wilson and on the South-West and remainder of the North sides by private Carriage Roads." Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd and passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd. The field, combined with the neighbouring plots to the east, was sold in the 1890s; it was called Ox Close and comprised 6a 0r 11p used as pasture. Within a decade, houses began to be built on the land. The south-western tip of Number 1A was actually just outside the boundary of the allotment, being the corner of two roads (road numbers 8 and 10). Number 5 was built in the grounds of number 3 in 2001. These aerial photographs A & B (loaned by Sarah Horton) show this area clearly.

North Side – 7 (Badsey Map G066)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this land was an old enclosure owned by Sarah Wilson. It was an orchard and amounted to 0a 2r 13p. At some stage in the mid 19th century, it was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). The field, combined with the neighbouring plots to the west and east, was sold in the 1890s; it was by then known as Ox Close (possibly a corruption of Adcock’s Close as the eastern field had previously been known) and comprised a total of 6a 0r 11p used as pasture. Samuel Johns bought this part of Ox Close.

North Side – 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19 (Badsey Map G065)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Jones. It was known as Adcock’s Close (3a 2r 24p). Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. By 1890, when it was bought by the Evesham builders Espley & Co, it was known as Ox Close (as also was the land to the west) and was used as pasture. One assumes that Ox Close was a corruption of Adcock’s Close. In 1901, Espleys sold the land to James Brewer for £310. In October and November 1905, James Brewer sold all the southern section of the land in seven lots to Charles Knight, William Roger Wilkins, Augustine Dore, William Henry Ballard, David John Sears Dore, Walter Harwood and Arthur Sears. Within a few years, the present-day numbers 9-19 were built on the land.

North Side – 21, 23A, 23B, 25, 27 (Badsey Map G064)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this land was an old enclosure owned by Joseph Jones. It was called Brain’s Close and amounted to 3a 2r 29p. Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). The land was sold off around the turn of the century and was bought by William Hurd Adams. It now comprised a field of 3a 3r 19p called Brain’s Orchard and was used as pasture. By 1907, it was in the ownership of Mrs Elizabeth Evans. Housing development on this land did not begin until the 1920s.

North Side - 29, 31, 33, 35, 37 (Badsey Map W041)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, Joseph Jones was made the following third allotment: "Also all that other Allotment situate in Hadshill Field and Foxhill Field containing thirty-seven acres two roods and thirty-two perches including the private Road passing over the same, bounded on the East side by an Allotment herein awarded to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessees the said John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter and herein after Exchanged with the said Joseph Jones, on the South side by Allotments herein awarded to the said Thomas Byrd and the Churchwardens of Badsey and the Marchioness of Downshire, and an old Inclosure belonging to the said Thomas Byrd, on further part of the East side by the said last mentioned old Inclosure and Pitchness Closes, on further part of the South by old Inclosures belonging to Edward Wilson and an Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Byrd, on the remainder of the East by the said last mentioned Allotment, an old Inclosure belonging to the said Joseph Harper and herein after awarded in Exchange to the said Joseph Jones and the second Allotment herein awarded to the said John Jones, on further part of the South by the said private carriage Road marked Number 11, on part of the West and remainder of the South by old Inclosures belonging to the said Joseph Jones, on further part of the West by the first Allotment herein awarded to the said John Jones, on part of the North and remainder of the West by old Inclosures belonging to the said Joseph Jones and on the remainder of the North by Allotments herein awarded to the Reverend Thomas Williams, John Slatter and Edward Wilson respectively." In 1815, the road terminated at the eastern end of this allotment, but was extended eastwards when a farm grew up at Badsey Field. Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). The field was divided into smaller lots and put up for auction at the Kings Head Hotel, Evesham, on 24th November 1902. This part of the field was now 4a 1r 33p called Little Ground and was used as arable. The tenant was Alfred Ballard and he took the opportunity to buy the land. Housing development on this land did not begin until the 1920s. By 1912, when Percy Byrd sold the neighbouring field to the east, the large field which had been Joseph Jones’ large allotment, had been split up into much smaller fields. The piece of land on which these houses was situated was owned by A Ballard, whereas the land further east was owned by Mrs Johns, Mr Marshall, Mr A Bamber and the executors of Mr J Knight.

North Side – 39, 41 (Badsey Map G103 house and front garden; G102 back garden)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to John Gibbs (whom it is believed bought the land in 1780 from Robert Mason). It was part of three closes called Pitchness Close (two owned by John Gibbs, one owned by Thomas Byrd) and amounted to 1a 0r 12p. John Gibbs then exchanged with Thomas Byrd: "And the said Commissioners hereby assign, allot and award in Exchange to the said Thomas Byrd and his Heirs, All those two Closes or Inclosed Grounds called Pitchness Closes containing three acres and thirty-one perches in lieu of and in Exchange for the said fourth Allotment so awarded to the said Thomas Byrd." This enabled Thomas Byrd to consolidate his land-holding in the east of the parish and to extend the road across this land to get to the new settlement planned at Badsey Field. The back gardens of these two houses were originally part of the Pitchness Close old enclosure which belonged to Thomas Byrd; that field amounted to 3a 0r 7p. The land passed through inheritance to Percy Byrd, Thomas’ great-grandson, who, in 1912, tried to sell all the land at Badsey Fields Lane. By now these two old enclosures had long since been separated by the road; this section north of the road was known as Little Green whilst the section south of the road was known as The Green. Little Green was not sold in 1912 but was sold by 1919. A house (number 39) was built on the land in the following decade.

North Side – Badsey Nurseries (Badsey Map W045)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, The Dean and Chapter of Christ Church and their Lessee the Marchioness of Downshire were made the following second allotment: "Also all that other Allotment or parcel of Land situate in Foxhill Field containing two acres two roods and two perches bounded on the East by the Allotments herein awarded to the Churchwardens and Curate of Badsey, on the South and West by old Inclosures belonging to the said Thomas Byrd and on the North by the third Allotment herein Awarded to the said Joseph Jones, which said last mentioned Allotment is herein after given in Exchange to the said Thomas Byrd." The Marchioness of Downshire then exchanged with Thomas Byrd: "And the said Commissioners hereby assign allot and award in Exchange to the said Thomas Byrd and his Heirs, All that the aforesaid Allotment or parcel of Land containing two acres two roods and two perches being the second Allotment herein awarded to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessee the said Marchioness of Downshire and bounded as herein described in lieu of and in Exchange for, All that piece of Inclosed Land herein after described. And the said Commissioners order and direct that the Mounds and Fences on the East and North sides of the said Allotment shall be made by and for ever hereafter kept in repair by and at the expense of the said Thomas Byrd and the owners and occupiers of the said Allotment for the time being." Thomas Byrd extended the road across this land to get to the new settlement at Badsey Field. The land passed through inheritance to Percy Byrd, Thomas’ great-grandson, who, in 1912, tried to sell all the land at Badsey Fields Lane. By now this field, together with the field immediately to the east (which had originally been allotted to the Curate of Badsey but was then exchanged with land held by Thomas Byrd in 1815) was sold as one field of 10a 0r 9p known as Badsey Field. A 10-foot track separated the two parts of the field. Badsey Field was not sold in 1912 but was sold by 1919.


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South Side – 2, 4, 6, 8 (Badsey Map W005 northern part; Badsey Map G061 southern part)

The northern part of the plot of land where these houses are situated amounted to a narrow strip of common land on the south side of Badsey Fields Lane. In 1815, when the Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, John Jones was given 0a 2r 3p on Powells Green: "Unto John Jones and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All those three several Allotments next herein after awarded, that is to say, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate on Powells Green containing two roods and thirty-four perches, bounded on the East by an Allotment herein awarded to Joseph Jones, on the South and remaining part of the East by old Inclosures belonging to the said John Jones, on the West and North by the Wickhamford Road and the private carriage Roads marked Numbers 8 and 10." The back gardens and, in the cases of all but number 8, the southern part of the houses, formed part of an old enclosure called Sand Close (4a 0r 18p) belonging to John Jones. It remained in the Jones family until 1888 when it was sold. Houses were not built on this part of the land until the 1960s.

South Side – 10, 12, 14 (Badsey Map W005 northern part; Badsey Map G062 southern part)

This amounted to a narrow strip of common land on the south side of Badsey Fields Lane. In 1815, when the Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, John Jones was given 0a 2r 3p on Powells Green: "Unto John Jones and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All those three several Allotments next herein after awarded, that is to say, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate on Powells Green containing two roods and thirty-four perches, bounded on the East by an Allotment herein awarded to Joseph Jones, on the South and remaining part of the East by old Inclosures belonging to the said John Jones, on the West and North by the Wickhamford Road and the private carriage Roads marked Numbers 8 and 10." The back gardens formed part of an old enclosure called Sand Close (3a 3r 22p) belonging to Joseph Jones, John's brother. Joseph Jones inherited the land after John's death in 1850. At some stage in the mid 19th century it was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). This field, together with land to the east, now comprised a field of 16a 1r 20p called Sands and Harper’s Close, and was sold in smaller lots in 1890. By 1891, two houses (Numbers 10 & 14) occupied the site. Number 12 was built in the grounds of number 14 in 1909.

South Side – 24, 24A (Badsey Map W041)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, Joseph Jones was made the following third allotment: "Also all that other Allotment situate in Hadshill Field and Foxhill Field containing thirty-seven acres two roods and thirty-two perches including the private Road passing over the same, bounded on the East side by an Allotment herein awarded to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessees the said John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter and herein after Exchanged with the said Joseph Jones, on the South side by Allotments herein awarded to the said Thomas Byrd and the Churchwardens of Badsey and the Marchioness of Downshire, and an old Inclosure belonging to the said Thomas Byrd on further part of the East side by the said last mentioned old Inclosure and Pitchness Closes, on further part of the South by old Inclosures belonging to Edward Wilson and an Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Byrd, on the remainder of the East by the said last mentioned Allotment, an old Inclosure belonging to the said Joseph Harper and herein after awarded in Exchange to the said Joseph Jones and the second Allotment herein awarded to the said John Jones, on further part of the South by the said private carriage Road marked Number 11, on part of the West and remainder of the South by old Inclosures belonging to the said Joseph Jones, on further part of the West by the first Allotment herein awarded to the said John Jones, on part of the North and remainder of the West by old Inclosures belonging to the said Joseph Jones and on the remainder of the North by Allotments herein awarded to the Reverend Thomas Williams, John Slatter and Edward Wilson respectively." In 1831, Joseph Jones sold this land at auction. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. Part of this field (south of Badsey Fields Lane), together with land to the west and east, now comprised a field of 16a 1r 20p called Sands and Harper’s Close. The land was split into smaller lots and, within a decade, the present-day number 24 had been built on a plot bought by William Hurd Adams.

South Side – 26, 28, 30, 32, 32A, 32B, 34 (Badsey Map W036)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, Thomas Byrd was made the following fourth allotment: "Also all that other Allotment or parcel of Land situate in the Sand Field containing three acres one rood and thirty-eight perches, bounded on the East by an old Inclosure belonging to Edward Wilson, on the South by Sand Close, and on the West and North by an Allotment herein after awarded to the said Joseph Jones, which said last mentioned Allotment is herein awarded in Exchange to John Gibbs." He then, however, exchanged it with John Gibbs for a smaller piece of land to the east, but this enabled him to consolidate his land-holding in the east of the parish. "And the said Commissioners hereby assign allot and award in Exchange to the said John Gibbs and his Heirs, All that the aforesaid Allotment or parcel of Land containing three acres one rood and thirty-eight perches being the fourth Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Byrd and bounded as herein before described in lieu of and in Exchange for, All that piece of Inclosed Land herein after described. And the said Commissioners order and direct that the Mounds and Fences on the North side of the said Allotment shall be made and at all times kept in repair by and at the expense of the said John Gibbs and the owners and occupiers of the said Allotment for the time being." It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd at some time in the mid 19th century; it was definitely in the ownership of Sarah Byrd by 1866 when the neighbouring land to the east was sold. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). This field, together with land to the west and south, now comprised a field of 16a 1r 20p called Sands and Harper’s Close. The land was split into smaller lots and sold. At some time in the 1890s, Norfolk House (the present-day number 34) was built. Number 28 was built in the 1920s and three bungalows (numbers 26, 30 & 32) were built in the 1960s. In 2005, two chalet bungalows (25A & 25B) were built on the northern part of the land which had belonged to Norfolk House.

South Side – Long Close (Badsey Map G105)

There are no buildings on this land and the field is let out to a tenant. In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Edward Wilson. It was called Long Close and amounted to 4a 2r 12p. On 23rd July 1866, Edward Wilson sold the land at an auction at The Northwick Arms Hotel, Evesham, in Lot 6 (the measurement was given as 4a 1r 32p). It was bought by Henry Byrd and still remains in the Byrd family to this day.

South Side – Buildings and land formerly occupied by Badsey Lavender Fields (Badsey Map G102 northern part; G104 western part)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land comprised three old enclosures: Pitchness Close (3a 0r 7p) and Pitchness Ground (7a 0r 38p), which belonged to Thomas Byrd, and Pitchness Close (2a 0r 19p) which had originally belonged to John Gibbs (whom it is believed bought the land in 1780 from Robert Mason) but was then exchanged with Thomas Byrd. Thomas Byrd extended the road across the northern part of Pitchness Ground to get to a new settlement at Badsey Field. The 1883 Ordnance Survey map shows buildings on the bend of the road. They are still there to this day but are disused; the 1912 Sales Particulars describe them as "brick and tiled piggeries, stable and open shed and large yard". Some time between 1883 and 1912, a drift road of 9 feet was built to the east. This whole area, to the south of Badsey Fields Lane, east of Long Close and west of The Bittons was a field known as The Green, amounting to 12a 1r 8p. It was sold in 1912 by Percy Byrd, Thomas’ great-grandson. During the 1990s until about 2004, Badsey Lavender Fields occupied the land; as at 2006, it is currently barren.

South Side – Aramena, The Bungalow (Badsey Map G108)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Thomas Byrd. It was called Bittern Close and amounted to 8a 2r 9p. Some time between 1883 and 1912, a drift road of 9 feet was built to the west, which then turned eastwards along the southern perimeter. In 1912, Percy Byrd, Thomas’ great-grandson, tried to sell all the land at Badsey Fields Lane. It was now known as The Bittons and amounted to 11a 0r 6p. The acreage had increased because, when a new track was built to the settlement at Badsey Field, a small section of Badsey Field was now separated by the road. It was sold in eight lots, some being sold in 1912 and some at a later date.

South Side – Orchard Bungalow, La Campagna, Orchard Cottages, The Barn, Orchard End (Badsey Map W047)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, Thomas Byrd was made the following third allotment: "Also all that other Allotment or parcel of Land situate in the Hadshill and Foxhill Fields containing ninety-five acres two roods and two perches, bounded on the East by the Parish of Bretforton, on the South by an Allotment herein awarded to the said John Jones, on the West by old Inclosures belonging to the said Thomas Byrd and Allotments to the Curate of Badsey and Churchwardens of Badsey, and on the North by Allotments herein awarded to the said Joseph Jones, the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessees the said John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter, Sarah Harrington and others and John Procter." In the decades following enclosure, a settlement grew up at the extreme western edge of the plot, known as Badsey Fields Farm (the present-day Orchard Cottages and Orchard End, with The Barn being converted into residential accommodation in the 20th century). In 1912, Percy Byrd, Thomas’ great-grandson, tried to sell all the land at Badsey Fields Lane. The cottages, farm buildings and Little Orchard were not sold in 1912 but were sold by 1919. The land to the east comprised fields called White Hill, Rye Furlong, Pains Headland, Fox Hill, Church Headland, Long Furlong, Briar Croft. The only field left unsold was Rye Furlong on the eastern boundary of the parish, which amounted to 14a 0r 27p; it was at that time let in three allotments to James Barnard and William Sandford. In 2006, Rye Furlong still belongs to descendants of Thomas Byrd.

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 7 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.