Enclosure map project

Allsebrook Gardens, Badsey

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.
enclosure map

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photos: a7092 a7230

ALLSEBROOK GARDENS

Allsebrook Gardens was built in the early 1970s on the site of the old vicarage and part of a field known as Stockey. The old vicarage was demolished in 1971 and the land was sold to Maxim Homes Ltd on 20th October 1971; a new vicarage had been built just round the corner in the High Street earlier in the year. Ten executive detached houses were built in a cul-de-sac (numbered 1-11 with no number 10), the first house to be sold being number 7 on 20th May 1974. The nine other houses were sold between April and September 1975. Here are details about the planning application for Allsebrook Gardens (link to be added).

The road was named after Canon William Carmont Allsebrook, Vicar of Badsey and Wickhamford from 1903-1945, who was also Rural Dean of Evesham from 1921-1945 and Honorary Canon of Worcester Cathedral from 1930-1946.


The Old Vicarage at Badsey

North Side – 1, 2, 4 (Badsey Map G001)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land, amounting to just under an acre (0a 3r 9p), was an old enclosure belonging to the Church on which the vicarage was situated. The Reverend Charles Phillott (Curate of Badsey 1807-1852) was absent for most of the time as he held the living of Badsey in plurality with other parishes. The vicarage stood approximately in the middle of the present-day road on the bend (between numbers 1 and 4). The coach-house for the Vicarage was situated on the site of number 2 and backed on to the Mill Orchard. The Vicarage garden was reduced to 0a 2r 25p when Charles Phillott exchanged a small part of the garden (the back garden of the present-day number 1) with the Reverend Thomas Williams: "And the said Commissioners assign, allot and award in Exchange unto the said Thomas Williams and his Heirs, All that piece or parcel of Land containing twenty-four perches being part of the Parsonage Garden in lieu of and in Exchange for the said fifth Allotment of the said Thomas Williams." The remaining part of the land stayed in church hands until 1971 when it was sold for housing development.

North Side - 2 back garden (Badsey Map G004)

The back garden of Number 2 was part of Mill Orchard amounting to 0a 2r 0p, which was an old enclosure belonging to Anthony Smith. In earlier times, it had belonged to the Badsey family, who derived their surname from the village in which they lived for several centuries. The orchard was in the ownership of Richard Badsey in 1747, but was then bought by Edward Wilson. Edward Wilson sold the orchard to Joseph Smith in 1774. Anthony Smith (Joseph’s son) sold the orchard, along with the Mill, in 1818 to John Thorp, a silk manufacturer from Coventry. It remained in the Thorp family until 1863 when it was put up for sale. The Reverend Thomas Hunt was keen to buy it as glebe land, as it backed on to the Parsonage garden. .In December 1863, Hunt wrote to Christ Church to say that the orchard had reached a figure of £165; the Chapter had offered £105 and he wished to borrow the remaining £60. It remained part of Badsey Glebe until the 1960s when it was sold for housing development and two houses were built on Mill Lane.


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South Side – 3, 7 north-eastern section (Badsey Map G057)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was part of a field called Pig Close amounting to 2a 2r 17p, and was an old enclosure belonging to the Reverend Thomas Williams. It ran from the boundary with the Vicarage garden to the present-day School Lane. In 1815, the Reverend Thomas Williams exchanged a small part of it (26 perches, being the most westerly section near the Vicarage) with the Reverend Charles Phillott. The front driveway is part of the land exchanged to Charles Phillott, whilst the house and back garden occupy the land retained by Thomas Williams. Thomas Williams died in 1829 and the land passed by inheritance to the Allies family, remaining in their ownership until 1864 when they sold it to Joseph Woodward, the agent of the estate. Woodward in turn sold the Badsey part of the estate in 1866 (lot 1) to John Pickup Lord; he died in 1877, but his executors administered the estate for some time. In 1905, the Trustees of the Lord Estate sold the land to Christ Church, details of which may be seen in a Deed of Annexation of 1910.

South Side – 5, 7 south-eastern section (Badsey Map G059)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was part of a field called Great Stockey amounting to 7a 1r 35p, and was an old enclosure belonging to the Reverend Thomas Williams. In 1815, Reverend Williams exchanged just under an acre (0a 3r 13p) of this field, and other old enclosures, with the Reverend Charles Phillott: "And the said Commissioners assign, allot and award in Exchange to the said Charles Phillott and his successors as aforesaid, All that old Inclosure called Little Stockey and all those pieces or parcels of two other old Inclosures called Great Stockey and Pig Close containing together four acres two roods and nine perches in lieu of and in Exchange for the said fifth Allotment herein awarded in Exchange to the said Thomas Williams and his Heirs." The land remained in Christ Church hands until 1971.

South Side - 4 western part of back garden, 6, 7 western half, 8, 9, 11 (Badsey Map G058)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was part of a field called Little Stockey amounting to 3a 2r 10p, and was an old enclosure belonging to the Reverend Thomas Williams. In 1815, Reverend Williams exchanged this field, and other old enclosures, with the Reverend Charles Phillott: "And the said Commissioners assign, allot and award in Exchange to the said Charles Phillott and his successors as aforesaid, All that old Inclosure called Little Stockey and all those pieces or parcels of two other old Inclosures called Great Stockey and Pig Close containing together four acres two roods and nine perches in lieu of and in Exchange for the said fifth Allotment herein awarded in Exchange to the said Thomas Williams and his Heirs." The land remained in Christ Church hands until 1971.

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 7 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.